What is UX and Why Does it Matter for Your Customers?

User experience (or UX) can be a little difficult to define because it describes not only a professional practice but also the results of that practice. The concepts behind user experience have been around for a very long time but the term itself has only been around since the 90s. In the mid 20th century Henry Dreyfuss wrote –

“when the point of contact between the product and people becomes a point of friction, then the industrial designer has failed. On the other hand, if people are made safer, more comfortable, more eager to purchase, more efficient – or just plain happier – by contact with the product, then the designer has succeeded.”

mobile-hand

User experience puts science and research behind the design of products and services to improve the quality of the experience a user has with that product. Methods are used to discover what the user needs and to ensure that the final end product or service meets those needs in a manner the minimizes friction and maximizes pleasure. Deliverables are created through the UX process but they are not the end goal. It is more important to perform quality research to develop a true understanding of the needs of the user.

UX encompases a lot of factors including:

At Beacon, we always like to compare the web design and development process to building a house. User experience design is like creating the blueprints. First you have to find out what type of people will live in the building. You have to understand their needs and gather knowledge about them and about the neighborhood in order to get a better understanding of what type of house you should build. If you think of UX as the house plan, graphical design would be the equivalent of choosing the flooring, paint, and fixtures. Development is the ultimate construction process, and testing is the building inspection and walk through.

The most important skill of a UX researcher is knowing how to listen. There is no set of best practices that get robotically implemented – each project is unique and requires solutions that are reflective of the real needs and problems to be solved. The end result is the creation of a product that delights users and also functions well which can result in improved conversion rates, greater numbers of users, and ultimately a higher return on investment.

 

By | 2016-11-22T09:56:54+00:00 April 1st, 2015|Creative Design|Comments Off on What is UX and Why Does it Matter for Your Customers?

Beacon goes to Moogfest 2014

Beacon had the opportunity this past weekend to participate in Synthesis, an event by NCTA, at Moogfest in Asheville, NC. This portion of Moogfest was a high energy tech expo featuring a wide range of technology companies. Live entertainment was there, in true Moogfest spirit, and various speakers from the tech field presented throughout the day.

moog1 Beacon was able to participate in the various Moogfest workshops and presentations as well as enjoy all the live music the festival has to offer. The one thing that unites all the performers and speakers throughout Moogfest is the use of technology and innovation in their art and music. It was fascinating to see how technology is being used in both audio and visual experiences and to envision where these technologies will take us in the future. Excitement about interactivity and communication was a common theme throughout Moogfest. At the Google Creators Panel Discussion, the Google team talked about creating tools for mobile devices that allow users to create their own music. Mobile apps are enabling people to have easier access to all sorts of tools, breaking down barriers, and giving people new ways to create and learn. They also showed a project that used data (from Google Maps), combined with images and music to create an audio/video experience that was personalized to the user’s childhood neighborhood. This took the music used in the project to a new personal level. I think personalization and interactivity are always marketable things to integrate into a software product. When you can build a relationship between the user and the experience, then there is attachment there that helps build loyalty and this relates back to user experience and brand loyalty.

moog2 Moogfest is mostly about music, but there was definitely a lot to take away about design and user experience. NCTA’s Synthesis event was a great avenue for people to see how technology is applied across a wide range of areas. A big thank you goes out to NCTA for putting on this event and bridging the gap between technology in the business world and technology in the music world.

 

By | 2016-11-18T14:15:38+00:00 May 2nd, 2014|Beacon News|Comments Off on Beacon goes to Moogfest 2014

How To Make The Most Out Of Your Web Design

I spend a lot of time inside and outside of work studying design. I think it gets to a point for everyone where design becomes difficult to ignore, as it influences our every day decisions. It’s important to understand design elements and how they not only affect you on a day to day basis, but your customers as well. You can ask yourself the following questions:

How does my target audience perceive my brand?

Does my website’s design go hand in hand with my content?

What kind of experiences are users having when they land on my website?

Is my design making an emotional connection with my customers?

Because websites are so multi-dimensional, there is no one way to answer these questions. It’s an ever changing industry and with new technology comes updates on how we approach design. Lucky for you, Beacon has been in the industry for 16 years. We love answering these questions because these are the questions you have to ask to get to a successfully designed website.

Since being in the website industry, I’ve had the opportunity to wear many hats. This has helped me approach website design and development from every angle with all considerations in mind. Below I have listed a few elements to consider when designs a website.

 

User Experience

  • A beginners guide to UI design. Read more.
  • How to beat the paradox of choice in UI design. Read more.

Fonts

Colors

  • An introduction to color theory for web designers. Read more.
  • How to get a professional look with color. Read more.
  • Five web design colors that encourage visitors to click that subscribe button. Read more.

Images

  • How to use images effectively in websites. Read more.
  • How to use photography in web design. Read more.

And finally…

 

In today’s world, your website is one of your most vital marketing tools. If you would like to find out more about how redesigning your website can push your business forward, let us know!

By | 2017-08-15T15:50:26+00:00 April 11th, 2014|Cascade CMS|1 Comment

Redesigning Without Frustrating Your Users

Your users rely on your website to get things done. They are used to doing it a certain way. So when things change, people get frustrated. Nevertheless, change is necessary. So the job of your web design and development team is to try to make the changes go over as smoothly as possible.

Communicate with Your Users

Testing is a valuable tool to help you figure out where the problem areas of your website are. Gathering information by polling or asking your users to give their feedback can be incredibly valuable. But, keep in mind that sometimes what a user tells you about their experience with your site may not exactly match what really happens when they are actually on the site. There may be inconsistencies with a users intent and their action because of the contextual factors involved. Every time someone uses your site, the situation is different and therefore the results are different. Monitoring and using things like Google Analytics metrics will give you facts to compare to your collected empirical data.

Types of Change

Design changes are more immediately noticed, while workflow changes may take time to be detected by your users. Dissatisfaction with design changes may not be enough to keep them from using the site, but if the functionality of the site is compromised users may be discouraged. Therefore it is vital to ensure that any workflow changes will benefit the user in the end. Workflow changes can bring short term user dissatisfaction but valuable long term gain. Ultimately people are able to learn and adapt to the changes within a few days, and as long as the benefits last longer than this relearning period, their experience will ultimately be positive.

When is change necessary?

Change is always necessary when it solves a problem or serves a specific purpose. Ease of use, being the ultimate goal. Increased and varied functionality is only valuable when truly needed. You also need to consider the types of users you are designing for. There is no need to hold back for a small portion of your users, while inhibiting the experience of most of your users. Maintaining core consistencies with your old site, such as keeping things in the same general location and using familiar visual cues, will assist your user with making a smooth transition to your new design.

By | 2017-06-16T13:05:30+00:00 August 9th, 2013|Web Development, Creative Design|Comments Off on Redesigning Without Frustrating Your Users

Considering Drawer Style Site Navigation

Lately we have been utilizing a drawer style navigation in our designs to provide a better user experience in our websites. The request for quite a bit of content in the drop downs themselves (mega drop downs that span the full width of the site no matter which tab you have clicked) in some of our more complex higher-ed sites also creates the problem of covering up the content of the site and proving tricky when the site responds to mobile screen sizes. Putting the navigation in a sliding drawer is proving to be a unique solution that translates beautifully to mobile in responsive design.

If you look on Mashable, a popular news article site, the nav drawer does not shift the page down, but is a full width mega drop down menu. Compare to the University of Wyoming, a site recently developed by Beacon, which has a drawer based nav.

Mashable mega drop down navigation

University of Wyoming drawer based navigation

Whether or not this is the right nav for your site will probably be based upon a lot of factors like what type of content is in your drop downs and what type on content is on your homepage. If you have a lot of content in your navigation it may be worth while to put that navigation in a slider so that the homepage remains visible, even when the navigation is open. Also, you need to think about what your navigation does on mobile devices and tablets and how to best integrate this with your drop downs. Mashable.com serves up a different navigation for it’s tablet users, for example, simplifying the menu, so they put it in a side drawer. On the higher ed sites we develop here at Beacon, we need to provide a consistent navigation for users on every type of device, so we might use a similar drawer on both mobile and desktop, but just change the navigation to stack taller on smaller devices and open and close subsections. This also can allow us to integrate deeper navigational tiers in the main nav on mobile devices so we can keep the content area cleaner and simpler.

This solution can be elegant and it even translates very well to touch devices that do not have the ability to open menus on-hover. This keeps the experience more consistent through all the screen sizes by utilizing an on-click drawer.

Ultimately decisions like these need to be made on a case by case basis.

By | 2016-05-27T10:13:29+00:00 April 22nd, 2013|Web Development, Creative Design|2 Comments
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