29 01, 2019

Maintaining Content Focus on Your Higher Ed Site

By | 2019-01-29T08:13:10+00:00 January 29th, 2019|Categories: Higher Education, Web Development|Tags: , , , |

You’ve done it! Months of late nights and dedications to the design of the perfect higher ed website have culminated in a beautiful launch. It is all easy sailing from here, right? Well, maybe not.

Sure, your school’s new website is up and running. But, if your various content managers aren’t aligned in how they create, update, improve and retire the hundreds of pieces of content they are responsible for, things can spin out of control very quickly. It doesn’t take long for that beautiful, unifying design to get ruined. All it takes is a couple of content managers to do their own thing.

Content managers need a common set of instructions to work from. A clearly outlined, centralized content strategy will help them to stay on the same page. This will also ensure a consistent experience for users and a shared focus across the entire site.

Setting the Stage

So, how do you create a shared content strategy? If you haven’t yet, start by defining your organization-wide tone and voice. Next, set some content guidelines – word limits by page type, specific CTA usage for certain circumstances, image use directions, etc. You should also establish a school-wide content calendar and identify broad themes for specific parts of the year, or even month-by-month.

All of these tasks are best accomplished by the school’s marketing department – the marketing staff is the owner of the school brand, after all.

Be sure to disseminate the content guidelines and the content calendar to the content managers of the various departments. It may be worthwhile to hold a workshop to go over the guidelines and the publishing plans for the upcoming academic year. This will ensure that everybody creating your website content is moving to the same beat.

This doesn’t mean that your departments can’t pursue their own identities, voices and content ideas. They absolutely should. But departmental content guidelines should be subordinate to and not violate the organization-wide guidelines created by the marketing team.

Quality Content, On Deadline

Ok, we got everyone responsible for producing content on the same page. Now, how do we make sure that the content is produced on time and up to established quality standards?

What’s needed is a solid workflow and approval process. At Beacon, we like to lean on GatherContent to manage the content creation process. The cloud-based service has an intuitive CMS and easy-to-set-up workflows. A typical workflow may look something like this:

  1. First draft
  2. Primary review and feedback
  3. Editing/Revisions
  4. Approval
  5. Publishing
  6. Live on website

The above workflow is fairly simple. However, you may need to tailor your workflows for each department to account for how each separate team handles the writing and approval processes. You may need to add more steps to the process if the content has to pass through several people before being approved for publication. The workflow is where your departments can flex their individuality (not in the copy).

Workflows are great at moving content projects along. They’re also terrific at identifying bottle necks (who hasn’t had co-workers or directors who’ve hoarded content and held it hostage).

We recommend making your workflows accessible to all staff involved in content creation. This way, everyone is aware at all times where any piece of content is in the writing process. It should also encourage those reviewers who like to take their time to move the item along to the next step in the workflow.

Staying the Course

So, we have everyone on the same page and following the same rules and processes. What’s left?

Well, things move fast in higher ed. Your team of content managers will not stay static – turn over on college campuses is fairly high. You’ll need to assure that institutional knowledge is passed on when your people leave. While you can rely on the goodwill of your departing staff to train their replacements, the more prudent option is to simply provide regular trainings to your content team.

At minimum, schedule an annual review of your school’s content guidelines, workflows and content calendars. You may even want to do one every semester.

Beacon Knows Higher Ed Content

Are workflows and content guidelines a bit too intimidating? Don’t worry, we hear that a lot. Beacon experts are here to help. Give us a call and we’ll be glad to lend a hand.

15 01, 2019

Could Your Higher Ed Website Stand to Lose Some Weight?

By | 2019-01-29T08:52:20+00:00 January 15th, 2019|Categories: Digital Marketing, Google Analytics, Higher Education, SEO|Tags: , , , |

Happy New Year, everyone! How are you doing with your resolutions?

Ok, ok… put down the pitchforks. This is a safe space.

Every year, as the calendar turns, Americans rush to empower themselves to do those things that we find difficult. One of the most popular resolutions, year after year, is the commitment to get in shape. Come January, gyms swell with new members, even if the new recruits only stick around through March.

January seems to be THE months to shed those extra pounds that have accumulated throughout the previous 11. But, as we’re all collectively and diligently keeping our minds on our waistlines, I thought I’d shift our focus just a tad… to overweight websites.

Did you know that your higher ed website is also prone to unhealthy weight gain? It’s true.

The digital “weight” is the content that your website hosts. Your site can’t function without content, just like a human body cannot survive without food. But, too much content, wrong content or old content can prove to be counterproductive to the goal of maintaining a vibrant, inviting and healthy website.

Thankfully, keeping your site in peak digital condition does not require a gym membership. What you will need, however, is a good model of what you want your site to be, an objective analysis of your current site as is, and a plan of action to get you to your goals.

Step One: Define Good Content

What is good content? That’s not a philosophical or a rhetorical question. It has a real answer. It’s just that that answer can be complicated and completely unique to your site.

When they choose to pay attention, people learn through personal experiences which foods work best for fueling their bodies. You may notice an extra energy in the mornings whenever you add fruit to your breakfast cereal. Or, you might feel more creative and productive in your afternoon meetings after you have a healthy smoothie for lunch, instead of the generic burger value meal.

But, what works for you, may not work for someone else.

Same with your website content. Content that performs well on another website may not deliver the same results on your site. You can’t replace those learning experiences that define what “good” is for you.

Define good content by identifying the goals that you are trying to accomplish. Is it to improve engagement? Are you trying to share knowledge? Increase conversion? Describe the ideal attributes of content for each goal.

Then, compile a short list of your top-performing content and analyze what makes those pieces work. What value does a particular page provide to your target audience? What needs are being met? Is anything relevant being left out?

At the end of this process, you’ll have a fairly good working concept of “good content” for your site.

Step Two: Audit Your Content

Once you decide what good content is, you can evaluate your site for what you’re missing, what you have too much of, and what is no longer needed. Dig in and become an expert on your website content.

Begin with a content inventory to identify all the pieces of content currently live on your site. This will help you break down your content into different categories.  At Beacon, we like Screaming Frog for these types of audits.

Once you have your list, you can segment your content any number of ways: content type (blog, landing page, toaster message), format (text, video, pic), user journey stages (awareness, consideration, conversion), etc. Include as much information and data – metadata (meta descriptions, title tags), content length, social shares, posting date, etc – as possible.

Next, add performance data for each piece of content. Google Analytics can help you identify the pages and content that attract the most visitors and drive engagement.

And finally, assess each piece of content by the goals you established. Focus your attention on content that does not accomplish any goals and leave the content that already meets your criteria alone. Once this is complete, you’ll need to decide what to do with each piece of content individually.

Step Three: Prune Your Content

This is where some of your content will meet its end.

After you’ve split out the good content from the bad, you’ll need to evaluate whether the sub-optimal content is worthy of efforts to update and improve it. Keep in mind that not all of your content can or should be salvaged.

That said, many pieces of content can be improved or re-purposed. Just because a page is not attracting a lot of visitors or driving goal completions doesn’t make it useless. A new angle, better keywords or a more sophisticated use of keywords, improved structure or a more optimized CTA can all rescue copy from the digital waste bin.

The resources and bandwidth that you have at your disposal will affect what can and should be salvaged. You may only have the ability to work on a limited number of pages. Make an action plan to improve the content with the most potential to meet your website goals.

The remaining pieces of content are the excess fat that should be trimmed.

Beacon Knows Content Strategy

Pruning your website content can be a big job. Beacon can help. Our content experts can provide valuable advice and help you come up with a strategic plan of action. Give us a call.

18 10, 2018

Content Strategy: Do You Have a Plan Ready?

By | 2018-10-18T07:54:35+00:00 October 18th, 2018|Categories: Higher Education, Web Development|Tags: , , |

Content sure seems to be hording all the buzz in 2018. Take a look at the lineup of any higher ed marketing conference and you’ll be sure to find at least one or two speakers or break-out sessions promising the latest low-down on content strategy.

It’s not just higher ed. A number of content marketing conferences have sprung up over the last decade, as year after year is billed as THE year of content marketing.

For a long time, content had been relegated to an afterthought in the website building process, with graphic design and development driving project priorities. The current infatuation with content is the eco-system balancing itself to recognize an essential and under-valued component.

It makes sense. Websites are, after all, vehicles for delivering information. So, being able to present information strategically and skillfully is of great importance. Content is the whole reason people are going to your website in the first place.

Yes, there are now many advocates of the content-first approach. But, the truth is, neither content, nor graphic design, nor development should be thought of as “first.” The best approach to website building weighs each function equally – relying on the three processes to work together, in concert with each other. And, it’s important to consider and plan for the needs of all three at the outset of a web project.

That said, content is the only one of the three that plays a major role after a website is launched. A site with no new information loses relevance and becomes stale very quickly. It’s essential to have a plan in place for the development and publishing of new content. And, for this reason, a forward-looking content strategy is necessary for the long-term health of any site.

What goes into a comprehensive content strategy?

Research & Analysis

  • Content Audit – If you’re re-designing an existing site, you need to know what’s already there. A content audit will help you outline the current structure of the site, inventory the existing content and evaluate the quality. It’s also often helpful to do a top-level audit of your competitors’ websites, to gain a sense of industry standards.
  • Stakeholder Interviews – Ultimately, the website needs to satisfy the goals of the stakeholders. It’s imperative that their goals and priorities are clearly outlined. This group will also provide key institutional knowledge and strategic guidance.
  • Focus Groups and Surveys – It’s important to know how your current users think about the site, so you can optimize an even better user experience with the re-design.

Planning & Structure

  • Information Architecture – This document lays out the structure of your site in detail, accounting for the existence and location of every, single page.
  • Content Design – Whoever ends up writing the content for the new site will need to understand the purpose of each new page section and element, as well as where and how each page fits within the overall site structure. Each template should come with directions to help writers optimize the copy.
  • Functional Requirements – This document identifies every element on each page, and describes how it will work on the new site. Developers and designers refer to this document to guide their work.
  • Content Development/Governance Plan – Writing copy for a new website can be a lengthy process that involves numerous writers and editors. It’s important to have a clear understanding of the writing timeline (deadlines), as well as the role each person has.

Content Creation & Entry

  • Content Writing – Optimally, the content is being written as designs are finalized and the site’s templates are being developed. Progress should be tracked via the content development plan and follow the governance protocols.
  • Content Import & Integration – Once the templates are built and the copy written, content can begin to be ported in. Newly written content should already be optimized for the new site templates. However, if pages are being brought over from the old site, editing and additional integration efforts may be required.

Post-Launch Planning

  • On-going Content Development – New content is vital for your site to continue serving your users’ needs. As before, writing efforts should be scheduled via the content development plan and administered by the governance protocols already in place.
  • Content Owner Trainings – Many sites begin a slow decline after launch. Often, this is because the process of adding new content doesn’t follow best practices or intended use cases. Sometimes, new content owners are not familiar with the correct procedures or usage. A regular cadence of trainings can help to keep everyone on the same page and minimize content problems post-launch.
  • Content Maintenance Audits – One of the biggest problems with older websites is that they sprawl. You want content that user want, of course. But, at some point it becomes too much. An annual content audit can help manage that inevitable sprawl.
  • Archiving – Another solution for sprawl. You don’t have to permanently delete old content. Keeping outdated content on file, but off line, is a good way to prune your site without losing the hard work that went into developing that content. And, old can become new again. You can use the archived copy as inspiration and starting point for new content.

Beacon Knows Content Strategy

Need some help with content strategy for your higher ed website? We’d love to help. Give us a call, our content strategy team is here for you.

19 11, 2015

How to Craft a Social Media Content Strategy

By | 2016-11-18T12:09:54+00:00 November 19th, 2015|Categories: Social Media|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

 

It is true that social media can be beneficial to a business, but it can also cause a migraine at the same time. If not implemented properly it can damage your business’ reputation or become a waste of time. Here are some important steps to keep in mind when developing a social media content strategy. This will help keep your content relevant and work to amplify your postings. Some steps to include are brainstorming, research, and determining which platforms to use.

Brainstorming 

First, let’s start off with brainstorming potential content ideas. These will help build shareable content. In this stage it is important to think broadly about your industry. It is necessary to think about how you can branch out to reach a wider audience. It is a good idea to not have a narrow view of your business when brainstorming content topics at first. Once you build out a variety of topics and ideas you can always go back and decide what fits your brand image. Try to think of all the components that work together to make up your business. For example, let’s say I own a skateboard shop. I might produce content about skateboard maintenance or the benefits of skateboarding. This tactic will help you build a diverse social media content strategy.

Here is a visual representation of my thought process when brainstorming content:

Content Map

 

Research 

Once you have spent time brainstorming, then it’s time to move on to the next phase, research. We want to learn what types of content are performing well in our industry.

In continuing on with our skateboarding example, let’s say I am done brainstorming. Now I have some topics I want to build out content around. It’s time to dive into some content research so I have a better idea of what performs well. This will vary by industry and whether you’re a B2B or B2C business.

When conducting my research, I use several tools to learn what is performing well. For this, I am going to start with a neat and free tool called Epicbeat, which I think is an appropriate name for a social media tool. Epicbeat will help you discover popular content, influencers, and industry insights.

First, I want to enter in the term I will be researching.

Social Media Content StrategyThen, I am directed to a dashboard that gives a quick view of several key factors. These factors will help me find content to re-share and give me greater insight into what I need to create.

Social Media Research Which Platforms? 

The few things I want to get insight into are which platforms are popular and what types of content perform best. Then, I want to know when I should be posting to my platforms.

Social Media Content ResearchRight away I see that Facebook is the most popular channel followed by Vine and Instagram. I also get some other metrics such as average shares per post and a few other engagement metrics which is great. This tells me the type of engagement I can expect from each social platform. I also want to look for what type of content is most popular within this industry.

Now from my research, I know I should focus on Facebook and maybe Instagram as well. This will help get my social media content strategy off to a great start. After reviewing the engagement metrics, I know where I need to be to have an impact. Keep in mind, it is important to start a social media campaign small and scale up. In most cases, it is better to have one or two social profiles than five that you rarely engage with users on.

Content ResearchEpicBeat is nice enough to give me the distribution by content type for skateboarding. This gives me a better idea of the types of content to either begin producing or re-sharing. Right away I see that ‘how’ articles are trending with Listicles, and Interviews trailing. If I skipped this step and ran giveaways and produced guides, I would have missed a lot of engagement. This is why research is so crucial so you are not fumbling around in the dark.

I’m at a great starting point now I have my topics I want to build content around. I also have a better idea of which social platforms my target audience are active on. Now I have a better understanding of the content types I will begin curating. I even have an idea of what I can re-share to my platforms to further encourage engagement too.

Tools make research easier, but you should still browse followers to gain more insight. Look for what they are sharing and engaging with, and news they consider important. This will help you plan your social media content strategy in an effective manner. As an added bonus, I like to use Klout to spot trending content pieces and re-share them with my followers. Only use this platform once you have taken the time to research your industry and build out topics. This can be a great way to find relevant news about your industry.

Klout Content ResearchKlout shows content to reflect the best trending pieces related to your industry. Klout also includes a search function as well so you can do further research. This allows me to take topics I built out earlier and search for trending articles. Another feature like EpicBeat is the ability to find influencers within your niche. You can even research influencers within your industry and see content they engage with.

Klout Content Research Once inside the platform, there is no need to go back and forth between Hootsuite to schedule a post. You can schedule all your content within the platform as well and save some time. Remember, research is the cornerstone of a successful social media content strategy. Taking the time to brainstorm will lead to unique ideas that may not have developed otherwise.

As a side note, you can have a great social media content strategy but without goals you can get off track. Setting goals that impact your business is important when starting a social media campaign.

By brainstorming, researching, and evaluating platforms, you can start an effective social media campaign.

Happy sharing!