18 10, 2015

How to Properly Handle Pagination for SEO [Free Tool Included]

By | 2017-08-11T16:08:58+00:00 October 18th, 2015|Categories: SEO|Tags: , , , |

Let’s start out by defining what I mean by ‘pagination’. This mostly applies to ecommerce sites where there are multiple pages of products in a given category, but it can occasionally be seen on lead-gen sites as well. Here’s an example of what this might look like:

  • http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all
  • http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all?page=1
  • http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all?page=2
  • http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all?page=3
  • http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all?page=4

(pages 3 & 4 don’t actually exist on this site, but it helps illustrate my example a little bit more)

In this case, you’ve got 4 pages all with the same meta data. It’s likely that search engines are going to index all of the pages listed above, and count the pages with parameters as duplicates of the original first page. You’ve also got a duplicate hazard with /collections/all and/collections/all?page=1. If you’re concerned with search engine optimization and your organic visibility, you’re going to want to keep reading.

Proper Pagination for SEO

So, how do you go about solving this problem? Fortunately, all the major search engines recognize and obey rel= tags; rel=canonical, rel=prev, and rel=next. The canonical tag says “hey, we know this page has the same stuff as this other page, so index our preferred version”. The ‘prev’ and ‘next’ tags say “we know these pages are paginated and have duplicate meta elements, so here’s the page that will come next, and here’s the one the precedes it”. There are HTML tags that go along with each of these that you’ll need to have your dev team add to the <head> section of the pages. Rather than show you what these tags are and how to generate them for each page, I’ve built an Excel spreadsheet that will generate all necessary tags (for paginated categories up to 20 pages in depth), all you need to do is add your base-URL at the top and hit enter. By ‘base-URL’ I mean this: “http://www.freakerusa.com/collections/all?page=”, basically it’s the paginated URL without the actual number of the page.

Tag Builder CTA

8 10, 2015

Should I Use Canonicals or 301 Redirects?

By | 2017-08-08T08:42:09+00:00 October 8th, 2015|Categories: SEO|Tags: , , |

Should you 301 redirect that page to another, or should you use a rel=canonical tag? There are tons of reason why you might have some redundancy on your site. If it’s an eCommerce site, you’re probably displaying product listing pages a few different ways (sort by price, color, rating, etc.), or you might have navigation pages that are similar to your SEO landing pages. Whatever the case may be, chances are pretty good you have some form of duplication on your site that needs addressing.  This topic has been debated for years, but the real answer lies in one simple question:

Should people be able to access both pages in question?

Should I use canonicals or 301 redirects?

If the answer to this questions is Yes, you want to use rel=canonical. Doing so will point search engines towards your preferred page, but won’t prevent people being able to access, read, and interact with both pages. Here are some times you might see the rel=canonical tag in action:

  • www & non-www versions of URLs
  • parameters that change how a product listing page is sorted
  • navigation pages that point to an equivalent SEO landing page (it doesn’t always make sense to put content on a nav page)

If the answer to your question is No, you should remove that page and 301 redirect it. Page removal is much more common among eCommerce sites where products are discontinued but you can’t just remove the page (what if someone is linking to it?!?). Occasionally, you’ll see cases where this needs to be done for SEO landing pages. In the case of large SEO projects, where there are hundreds or thousands of keywords, content can get duplicated easily. Keeping a perfect account of every single SEO landing page that’s been written is basically impossible, so you might end up with two different pages with URLs like this: /blue-widgets and /widgets-that-are-blue. Obviously, even if the content isn’t identical, you can’t keep both of those pages around. Figure out which one has the most authority, links, and traffic – keep that one, and redirect the other one to it.

Next time you come to this fork in the road, remember to ask yourself whether or not there is value in people being able to see both versions.