Redesign Tips: Make Sure Google Analytics is in Tip-Top Shape!

With your upcoming redesign, you’ll be addressing new priorities and objectives. This will require you to rethink the ways in which you’re tracking various goals and events. You may even need to update to the latest GA tracking code type if you’re not already using it.

Google Analytics needs to be addressed from the earliest planning phase. If not, things could get ugly but quick. If you don’t have a sound Google Analytics plan in place before you re-launch, you may experience a tracking lapse and lose valuable data.

Even with the best planning, it can be easy to forget small but important details. And since I’d hate to see things go south on you, I’d like to share some tips to help ensure that your redesign goes off without data related hitch. So, here goes….

Tip #1: Assess your objectives and tracking needs.

There is no more important step than knowing what you need to track (and why). Without a tracking strategy, you can check off the rest of the items on your list and still end up with sub-par analytics. Relate website analytics to the business objectives, and allow that to drive the tracking strategy.

For many Higher Ed clients with whom we work, this means gaining a clear understanding of objectives per audience type. While prospective students are typically the most critical audience, you cannot forget to account for current students, alumni, etc.

In the world of eCommerce, the tracking strategy involves taking a look at what happens that might or might not lead to a purchase. Are the calls-to-action effective? Is the product page template driving people to add to cart and buy? The tracking must help answer such questions.

Tip #2: Create a reference of all potential tracking elements.

This is not just a simple list of what you wish to track. Rather, it is a helpful planning tool (which can also be utilized any time that tracking updates are needed). This document should help answer question such as:

  • What should be tracked as an event? Virtual pageview? Goal?
  • For which interactions will you need a custom dimension?
  • What page elements are tied to each tracking element?

If there are multiple people involved in the project including web developers, this reference document helps get everyone on the same page.

Tip #3: Use Google Tag Manager for all tracking elements.

Anyone involved in a redesign knows that web developers never have enough available time. Google Tag Manager can greatly reduce the need for web development resources and make the digital analyst’s time more efficient. In a 2016 Beacon survey, we found that two-thirds of higher education institutions were using Google Tag Manager. Based on our projects over the past 12 months, that percentage is growing rapidly.

The best aspect of implementing Google Analytics for redesign through Google Tag Manager is the independence gained by not having to submit updates to the web development team. Sync up with the redesign launch’s timing so that you can make necessary changes for the live site.

Tip #4: Utilize goals, site search, etc.

Believe it or not, we have come across quite a few websites that under-utilize these features (or are not using them at all!). Imagine not having any site search data. How would you know which content is difficult for your users to find? And what if you had no goals and were guessing at your website’s effectiveness?

These all need to be configured when building out the tracking for the redesign test environment. That allows for time to test and validate these tracking features before the redesigned site goes live. Speaking of testing and validating…

Tip #5: Test and validate all of your tracking!

The live site is not meant for testing. You are dealing with a new site that has new tracking elements. While the designers and developers are putting the finishing touches on the redesigned site, utilize the reference document to test and validate all tracking that you have implemented in Google Tag Manager. This gives ample time for you to make any necessary updates and retest.

Once the website is launched, you will need to repeat the same exercises from the pre-launch testing and validation. During both pre and post-launch, the Real-Time reporting in Google Analytics can help with pageview, event, and goal tracking. Also, be sure to check for session continuity during your testing. For the rest of your tracking instances (and to double-check behind Real-Time reporting) utilize the many standard reports provided in your Google Analytics view.

A Final Tip

Start with a Google Analytics audit. I encourage you to reach out to a Beacon team member at 1.888.995.7672 with any inquiries. Please feel free to contact me with any questions regarding your website redesign and proper Google Analytics set up. And once your new site is live and information is flowing with no interruption, there is one thing you simply must do. Walk across the street to your nearest watering hole and have a congratulatory drink for a job well done.

Gus Kroustalis
Gus has an MBA from Elon University and brings seven years of experience in sales and marketing analytics to the Beacon team. He is the lead Google Analytics Strategist, which includes implementation and setup of GA for clients as well as management of Beacon’s GAFUSION product. Outside of his work at Beacon, Gus has been cooking at the Winston-Salem Greek Festival for over a decade, coaches high school basketball, and still believes that the best movies were filmed in the 80s.

Connect with Gus on Google+.

By | 2017-08-04T10:36:57+00:00 August 3rd, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Redesign Tips: Make Sure Google Analytics is in Tip-Top Shape!

19 Engagements on an eCommerce Site You Should be Tracking

For our client Soffe, we completed a Google Analytics Migration from the old classic GA code to the new Universal set up through Tag Manager. With this upgrade Soffe went from having very little engagement data (event tracking, virtual pageviews, goals and ecommerce info) for their eCommerce site to now having lots of great information that they can use to continue to improve their site and learn about their customer behavior. Not only are they now able to use all the great features in GA that is offered with the Universal Code but they also have been upgraded to enhanced eCommerce.

I wanted to use them as the example of engagement areas on an eCommerce site that you should be tracking if you are not already. So here are some areas you should be tracking.

Engagements to Track on an eCommerce Site

  • Contact Interactions:

o   Phone calls

o   Chats

o   Contact form submissions

o   Email address clicks

  • Cart Page Interactions:

o   Deleting a product

o   Applying a coupon code

o   Getting a shipping a quote

o   Paypal checkout

o   Move to wishlist

o   Update Cart

  • Product Detail Page Interactions:

o   Add to cart

o   Add to wishlist

o   Social Sharing

o   Review submissions

o   Size Chart Views

  • Other Interactions:

o   Email Sign Up

o   Video Views

o   Outbound Links

o   Account Logins/Creations

As mentioned before, these are just a few engagements on Soffe.com that we tracked. If I shared the full list with you, it would be super long. With that said though, there are many areas of an eCommerce site that should be tracked and if your GA set up is missing areas of engagement on your site, then give us a call!  We can help set up your site to be fully tracked in Google Analytics.

Not sure if you’re site is set up well or is missing some areas of tracking? Request a FREE assessment.

 

 

Ashley Agee
Ashley has a BS in Business with a concentration in Marketing from UNCG. She considers herself a marketing maniac during the day and marvelous mom at night. When not working she enjoys spending time with her family and training horses.

Connect with Ashley on Google+

By | 2017-08-07T16:07:54+00:00 June 19th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on 19 Engagements on an eCommerce Site You Should be Tracking

Going Into a Redesign: How Google Analytics Reports Can Help

Would you read The Two Towers before The Fellowship of the Ring? Watch Godfather III before The Godfather? Of course not. You need context to get the most out of any sequel.

The same is true with a website redesign.

With a new redesign, you may hope to accomplish a number of important objectives including:

  • Improving compatibility with mobile devices
  • Updating styling strategy
  • Implementing a new content strategy
  • Providing more nimble page template capabilities

One things is for certain. Your website needs to accomplish its underlying goals at a more successful rate after the re-launch. You need to leverage all the information currently at your disposal including your website’s past performance. Your website’s analytics is a great source for this information. For websites undergoing a redesign, Google Analytics should be required reading.

Google Analytics offers a wealth of data related to website visitor activity. Tracking features beyond GA’s out-of-the-box solution takes that dataset to even greater heights. So, when considering analytics for a redesign, which Google Analytics reports can have the greatest impact?

Here are just a few of the options available:

Audience Device Category

Mobile browsing is quickly increasing its slice of the pie as a large user set compared to desktop and tablet categories. This report gives an indication of the device category trends and the current breakdown of each device category’s session total. While a responsive redesign is most likely already a known part of the strategy, there is more to it. Which device category is (or will soon be) the largest user set? Which device category delivers the best-converting visitors? Answers to questions like those can help determine which device category is favored in the overall design.

Audience Technology

Every website’s software has compatibility parameters, especially with different browsers and browser versions. From this report, the software development team can learn of the most popular browsers and browser versions.

We have had instances where this report greatly influenced technology decisions when designing client websites. For example, in the higher education arena, some institutions use certain browsers and browser versions in their computer labs. Updating those browsers may not be an option, due to various factors with other software. This report is flexible enough to also give an indication of most popular screen resolutions. Knowing this information can help with break point decisions for a responsive design.

Site Content – All Pages

Are you gearing up for a new site hierarchy? This is the type of report that will help inform your decisions. If your website caters to audience subcategories, such as college and university websites, then you will need to incorporate advanced segments and/or secondary dimensions with this report. Ultimately, you want to know which pages are most popular, and with which audiences. From there, you can begin to build recommendations for the website’s header, footer, sidebar(s), call-outs, etc. Site Search

No matter how much the website is updated, some users will always navigate via site search, rather than a hierarchy of links. This report indicates the searched topics that are most common. Perhaps your team has overlooked a few obvious pages that should be accentuated more in the website’s navigation. A review of site search data can prevent these oversights.

Goals / Ecommerce

Using this report combined with the goal data from the above reports will help paint a clear picture of the effectiveness of the current website. Normally, the goal and/or eCommerce analysis will not necessarily result in a perfect conversion strategy for the newly redesigned site. However, you will come away with changes that should be made to the conversion funnel and new ideas on how to make certain goal conversion opportunities more visible for your users. From there, you can determine a set of A/B tests that you wish to conduct once the new site is launched.

Make Your Website Redesign One for the Books

As one of the country’s longest standing Google Analytics partners, Beacon has been providing Google Analytics support for organizations of all kinds large and small. Additionally, our software development team has redesigned hundreds of websites, ranging from online storefronts to Higher Ed. We invite questions or comments regarding your redesign goals. Feel free to contact me or call one of our team members at 1.855.467.5447.

Gus Kroustalis
Gus has an MBA from Elon University and brings seven years of experience in sales and marketing analytics to the Beacon team. He is the lead Google Analytics Strategist, which includes implementation and setup of GA for clients as well as management of Beacon’s GAFUSION product. Outside of his work at Beacon, Gus has been cooking at the Winston-Salem Greek Festival for over a decade, coaches high school basketball, and still believes that the best movies were filmed in the 80s.

Connect with Gus on Google+.

By | 2017-08-08T08:22:09+00:00 June 15th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Going Into a Redesign: How Google Analytics Reports Can Help

New Variable Configuration in Tag Manager

If you’ve been using Tag Manger, you probably know how easy it is to forget about setting certain fields in each of your Tags, such as Cookie domain, cross domain tracking, etc. We’ve run into a couple instances of companies that have set up Tag Manager Tags for their websites and forgot to set all the proper settings in their tags. For one company in particular this caused their GA to show a large amount of self-referrals because their subdomains were not tracking properly. Luckily, that shouldn’t be an issue anymore for anyone using Tag Manager. Why you might be asking? It’s because now you have the ability to set up a Variable Configuration which can be used across all of your tags and contain the settings that need to always be in place to keep your website tracking properly.

This new Variable Configuration is called Google Analytics Settings.

variable configuration settings for tag manager

Within this variable configuration you can set up things like – cookie domain, cross domain tracking, ecommerce tracking, content groups, etc. Before this new variable configuration, you had to manually set these up in every.single.tag. Now you can set it up here, then use it when you set up new tags.

tag settings

Of course, if for some reason you don’t want to use it or shouldn’t, then you can always select the box to override the settings. When you do that, you’ll have to manually set up whatever fields you need though.

So tell me, have you used this new variable configuration for tag manager yet? Do you think it makes it easier to make sure all the proper settings are in place for each of your tags?

Ashley Agee
Ashley has a BS in Business with a concentration in Marketing from UNCG. She considers herself a marketing maniac during the day and marvelous mom at night. When not working she enjoys spending time with her family and training horses.

Connect with Ashley on Google+

By | 2017-06-06T12:05:15+00:00 June 12th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on New Variable Configuration in Tag Manager

Don’t Forget about Google Analytics when Redesigning Your Website

Are you planning to redesign your website soon? Have you already laid out the changes you want to make and have a timeline in place for getting the redesigned completed and launched? Is Google Analytics tracking code migration a task that is on your redesign list? If you answered yes, then I can tell website tracking is important to you. If you answered no, then you could be making a HUGE mistake and causing your team undue stress!! So this post is for you and I highly recommend you read on.

Make It A Priority

We have worked with many clients here at Beacon who have redesigned their sites. Some have worked with our development team and others have their own team. In house, Google analytics code migrations are always accounted for and known as a TOP PRIORITY before a site goes live. However, when we’ve worked with outside companies for development we’ve run into many instances where Google Analytics is a last thought. I’m actually working on site redesign right now where I get constant updates on when the site is planning to be launched live and yet the tag manager code hasn’t even been added to the site nor is eCommerce tracking in place. Despite sending numerous emails and having multiple phone calls, it just doesn’t seem Google Analytics tracking is a priority for the development team working on the site nor the PM managing all of the agencies. In all honesty, I’m very worried this site will be launched with no code in place or launched with the code in place but give me no time to get everything set up and tested before the site goes live. Either scenario is not good, which is why I wanted to write this post.

In a perfect world, all codes for GA (such as Tag manager container scripts, data layers, etc) would be added in the test environment so that GA can be fully set up and tested before the site goes live. Then when the site is ready to be pushed live, you switch out the UA ID variable, hit publish and you’re done.

What Can Go Wrong

In a not so perfect world, if the codes are added to the site after the site goes live it could potentially cause issues with codes conflicting, loss of tracking for a period of time and other problems. Let me share with you some examples of issues we’ve seen:

  • We’ve had GA codes conflict with other codes on a page which has caused pages to break.
  • We’ve seen checkout break due to codes conflicting. This is a BIG Problem for eCommerce site not just because people can’t check out and they are losing revenue now but they also could losing a lifetime customer.
  • We’ve seen websites go live with no tracking and therefore no visits were tracked for days which in turn messes up YOY data and keeps you from seeing if the site has any potential issues with SEO or usage.

While these might sound like easy fixes, they have not been. Which is why I would highly recommend making GA Code Migration an important step in your website redesign. Whether you’re in the midst of a redesign or just considering it, now is the perfect time to add Tag Manager to your site and move away from hard-coding GA. If you don’t have a large complicated site, then it takes no time for a developer to add the container code and any data layers needed for tracking. It’s much faster than adding hard-coded snippets to different elements on a site.

Start Planning Now

So with that said, don’t let GA tracking be an afterthought in your redesign process. Don’t let it fall through the cracks and miss out on tracking visits and engagements on your new site. Talk about it when you first start meeting to layout the redesign process. Make sure you have a GA specialist in your meetings who can tell you what codes to add, when to add them and get it tested before you push your new site live.

I promise you, making sure the code is in place and working correctly before a site goes live, keeps you and your development team sane and saves everyone from many headaches and the potential for lots of stress if it’s added afterwards.

Ashley Agee
Ashley has a BS in Business with a concentration in Marketing from UNCG. She considers herself a marketing maniac during the day and marvelous mom at night. When not working she enjoys spending time with her family and training horses.

Connect with Ashley on Google+

By | 2017-06-06T10:52:29+00:00 June 6th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Don’t Forget about Google Analytics when Redesigning Your Website

Wake Forest MSBA & Beacon – A Successful First Year

Final exams for our Wake Forest MSBA students ended Wed. What a great opportunity. Quad at Wake Forest UnivPosed with the question on how to improve the mobile marketing strategy for one of our top clients, the graduate students had to dig into our client’s live dataset in Google Analytics, produce a compelling executive level report and deliver a convincing, focused 5-minute presentation directly to the client and Beacon’s entire Digital Marketing Team. Yes, it was stressful.  Nerves were apparent.  But this was a real world scenario to get practice before they enter the job market.  We evaluated 38 presentations over 2 days and were impressed (and proud) of what they had learned from our team during the intensive 7-week course, especially with their poise and the ideas they delivered.  Afterward, our clients said they liked the variety and how the students made them think about their business, marketing and online strategy from new, different angles.  They also planned to share many of the ideas (and the experience) with the company’s president.

Beacon’s DMS Team put in a lot of time to structure the class around live data sets (provided graciously by 3 of our clients) and critical thinking exercises using real-world approaches with Google Analytics, SEO and Paid Search. Beacon was also able to arrange for Deepak Aujla, Global Analytics Program Manager at Google, to give a 45 minute online presentation about the importance of analytics in the marketing industry and the increasing demand for analytics professionals.  Another great learning opportunity, for everyone attending. (See previous post)

As I strolled through the Quad afterward, not only did the beauty of the campus consume me (again), but I was flooded with memories – especially of exam time and the relief when they were over. It was a similar feeling this time as I’m excited for the careers ahead of these students.  They were certainly anxious to graduate and move on, as I was in 1983, but they will miss this place.

Mark Dirks
Mark Dirks is the CEO for Beacon Technologies, but claims that Senior Web Business Consultant is more fitting. With a Masters Degree from Kansas State in Information Systems and a BS from Wake Forest in Mathematics/Computer Science, his passion is helping clients get the most out of their website and internet technology. Mark co-founded Beacon after spending a couple of years with RJ Reynolds and 13 years at AT&T. Outside of Beacon, he is an avid racquetball and softball player, while also coaching youth baseball and football.
By | 2017-06-05T07:59:21+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Wake Forest MSBA & Beacon – A Successful First Year

WFU Selects Beacon to Teach Graduate Level Analytics Course

Last year, when I discovered that Wake Forest’s Business School was starting a Master’s Program in Business Analytics (MSBA), I had to see how I could help. After all, it’s my alma mater AND analytics – two of my favorite things! So I was thrilled when our many discussions and planning sessions led to Wake selecting Beacon to teach its graduate level course in Digital Marketing Analytics this Spring.

Farrell Hall at WFU Analytics has been a critical component of Beacon’s offering since almost the day the company started back in 1998. It’s why Beacon is one of the longest active Google Analytics Certified Partners in the country.  The entire Beacon Digital Marketing Team is involved with this class, led by Gus Kroustalis, Beacon’s Lead Analytics Strategist and Andrea Cole, Beacon’s Director of Digital Marketing.  The team meets regularly internally to carefully plan each class around important topics, crafting in-class and homework assignments that expose the students to real world tools and thinking.  For most companies nowadays, their website is the centerpiece of their marketing strategy.  So this course emphasizes Google Analytics and walks the students through 7 intense weeks that includes

  • Key Metrics for the Web
  • Consumer Targeting
  • Engagement Analysis
  • Channel Analysis (SEO & Paid Search)
  • Attribution Models
  • Conversion Testing

The demand for critical thinking skills with respect to analytics data is enormous in today’s business world. Students that have tangible experience will hit the ground running and be able to provide immediate value to their employers.  Certainly, technology and the widespread availability of data are drivers, but it’s also about “brain-power”, the ability to analyze data with all the available tools to gain insights, formulate strategy and communicate well-founded recommendations that will improve ROI and/or decision-making.

Companies are clamoring for critical and creative thinkers. Graduates of Wake Forest’s MSBA program will certainly fill this demand.  The students will experience a rigorous, hands-on course that exposes them to actual live data from several of Beacon’s clients that have graciously agreed to participate.  Although they will learn many different tools, the emphasis will be on stimulating their business minds to develop intelligent insights, drive creative ideas and improve business.

It’s exciting that Wake’s MSBA students have the opportunity to work alongside Beacon’s recognized experts in Digital Marketing to get first-hand experience and knowledge. It will certainly make their resumes stand out.  Likewise, my DMS Team is equally excited to collaborate with, and learn from, the high-caliber students for which Wake Forest University is known.

Beacon's Gus Kroustalis Teaching

Mark Dirks
Mark Dirks is the CEO for Beacon Technologies, but claims that Senior Web Business Consultant is more fitting. With a Masters Degree from Kansas State in Information Systems and a BS from Wake Forest in Mathematics/Computer Science, his passion is helping clients get the most out of their website and internet technology. Mark co-founded Beacon after spending a couple of years with RJ Reynolds and 13 years at AT&T. Outside of Beacon, he is an avid racquetball and softball player, while also coaching youth baseball and football.
By | 2017-08-15T16:00:39+00:00 April 21st, 2017|Beacon News, Digital Marketing, Google Analytics|Comments Off on WFU Selects Beacon to Teach Graduate Level Analytics Course

Google Analytics Event Tracking Tutorial

Google Analytics, with its out-of-the-box tracking features, provides meaningful data about your website visitors and their activity. However, you are still required to configure goal conversion points, in order to track the overall success of your website. So, now you know where a user comes from, what pages they visit, and how many eventually reach a goal conversion point. But what about the rest of the user’s experience on your website?

Steps one and three of the conversion path are accounted for and can be analyzed. But what did the user do while on your pages? Why did some users reach conversion points while others did not? Event tracking is a feature in Google Analytics that can help fill in this critical middle step of conversion analysis.

Identify content elements that you would expect to influence the user experience. When setting up event tracking for those elements, you have a hierarchy of four data slots at your disposal: category, action, label, and value. It is best to assess your entire website for event tracking, so that the hierarchy of your setup is consistent and intentional. Event tracking can be configured by hard-coding the snippets on your website, or through Google Tag Manager. With this series of reports indicating your users’ content interactions, you are now able to bridge the gap between where your users come from and which ones reach conversion points. The most important question to answer when analyzing website user conversion trends is, “Why?”

Now, you are more equipped to provide that answer, which can lead to successful website updates.

GA Audit Request

Gus Kroustalis
Gus has an MBA from Elon University and brings seven years of experience in sales and marketing analytics to the Beacon team. He is the lead Google Analytics Strategist, which includes implementation and setup of GA for clients as well as management of Beacon’s GAFUSION product. Outside of his work at Beacon, Gus has been cooking at the Winston-Salem Greek Festival for over a decade, coaches high school basketball, and still believes that the best movies were filmed in the 80s.

Connect with Gus on Google+.

By | 2017-04-19T12:51:49+00:00 March 29th, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Google Analytics Event Tracking Tutorial

Using Google Analytics to Identify Prospective Students with Custom Dimensions

When auditing higher ed Google Analytics accounts, we typically see that clients calculate admissions content stats and goal conversion rates against their global data. This is despite the fact that they know not all people who visit the website are prospective students.

Wouldn’t it be great to have Google Analytics reporting that focuses on prospective students? How about other reporting sets for other audiences, too? The custom dimension feature in Google Analytics is a great way to build audience segments, and we can start with prospective students. First, you need to identify pages, links, buttons, and other content elements with which you have a high level of confidence that only prospective students would interact. Some examples include clicking an Apply Online call-to-action or scheduling a campus visit. Simply landing on the admissions home page is probably not a specific enough indicator of a prospective student. In the Google Analytics admin, you will need to configure a new custom dimension, possibly naming it Visitor Type. Be sure to set it as a user-level dimension so that data spanning multiple website sessions will be collected. If your Google Analytics tracking is hard-coded on the website, you would apply the given code snippet to all pages and page elements that indicate a user is a prospective student. If you are using Google Tag Manager, you would update your tags to include the custom dimension variable, ensuring it is only triggered by any of the pages or page elements you identified earlier.

After testing the new tracking and taking it live, you can utilize the custom dimension in a number of ways, including custom reports, dashboards, or even a new reporting view dedicated to the audience. Be mindful that you should assess the viability of each page and page element that make up your prospective student audience, in order to continue to have confidence in the parameters that define the audience. Of course, you can add or remove any pages or page elements as you see fit, always striving to have the audience tagging as accurate as possible.

 

Gus Kroustalis
Gus has an MBA from Elon University and brings seven years of experience in sales and marketing analytics to the Beacon team. He is the lead Google Analytics Strategist, which includes implementation and setup of GA for clients as well as management of Beacon’s GAFUSION product. Outside of his work at Beacon, Gus has been cooking at the Winston-Salem Greek Festival for over a decade, coaches high school basketball, and still believes that the best movies were filmed in the 80s.

Connect with Gus on Google+.

By | 2017-07-20T09:20:24+00:00 March 23rd, 2017|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Using Google Analytics to Identify Prospective Students with Custom Dimensions

Google Analytics Most Underused Report – Network Visits

Assuming your familiar with Google Analytics, then you know that GA has many valuable reports and lots of great information related to your website. At the basic level you can get sessions, pageviews, bounce rates and more. With advanced tracking you can get engagement metrics, goal conversions, offline data and more. However, did you know that from a basic level you can also get information related to sessions from certain Networks which can then be used for prospecting new clients?

The Networks report has been around a long time, yet we don’t see clients use it very often. When we talk to them, we realize they don’t see the benefit in the report and therefore don’t look at it. Yet, this report has a huge benefit, especially for B2B companies who could benefit from knowing what other companies are viewing their site.

Let’s dive into this report so I can give you an example of how we use it here at Beacon. First, to view this report you’ll need to open analytics and then go to Audience > Technology > Network.

service provider path

 

Now that you have this report open, you should see data related to Service Providers.

service provider report

 

Before I show you how we use this report, I want to fill you in on a secret you might not know.

Larger companies and even some small ones, have their own service providers, so therefore you will see their company name listed as a Service Provider!

Did you know that? Are you able to start seeing how this report can be useful? Have I sparked your interest and got your idea wheel spinning? I hope so.

Moving on though, let me show you how we find this report helpful here at Beacon.

Recently, we’ve started to work with more and more Universities and are slowly becoming a leader in this industry for providing web development and digital marketing services. So this report is great for us to see what Universities are looking at on our website. To do this, I use the filter function and Include Only Service Providers matching “university|college|school”.

service provider filter

Once this filter is in place, then I’m only seeing sessions from service providers with one of those keywords in the name. An example is below.

 

google analytics service provider

Now that I can see what schools are interested in Beacon, I can then filter it further by adding a second dimension for Pages and see what pages on our website these schools looked at. From here, I can pass along this information to our sales team so they can begin the process of reaching out to these Universities to see if our services could be of help to them.

This same method could be beneficial to you as well. You can apply the same steps I used, just change out the information to match your customers better. As an added bonus, since I know your filtering might not be as easy as ours, here’s a list of service providers you can exclude so you can then see what companies are left.

Time warner|mci|Verizon|Comcast|charter|cox|telecom|at&t|north state|communications|embarq|sprint|service provider|centurytel|private

From there, you’ll be able to get an idea of how you can better filter your data to get the information that would be most helpful to your business.

Don’t wait any longer! Go Dig in!

 

Ashley Agee
Ashley has a BS in Business with a concentration in Marketing from UNCG. She considers herself a marketing maniac during the day and marvelous mom at night. When not working she enjoys spending time with her family and training horses.

Connect with Ashley on Google+

By | 2017-08-08T08:26:55+00:00 October 19th, 2016|Google Analytics|Comments Off on Google Analytics Most Underused Report – Network Visits
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