7 11, 2019

Be Thankful for Your Paid Search Team

By | 2019-11-07T15:19:28+00:00 November 7th, 2019|Categories: Digital Marketing, Ecommerce, PPC|Tags: , , |

red and silver ornaments on christmas treeWelcome to the holiday season, everyone.

Wait, what? It’s barely past October. We’re still working through our Halloween candy stash, you might be thinking. It’s still pushing 70 degrees on the East Coast on many days.

This may all be true. Yet, that hasn’t stopped brick-and-mortar retailers from already decking out their stores with Christmas trees and stocking their shelves with red and green holiday paraphernalia.

Uh huh. That’s right. The holiday season is upon us. And there’s nowhere to hide.

The average consumer might be getting that descended upon feeling right about now. That’s because for us marketers, these are the most important weeks in the calendar. And, it’s not our fault…

Collectively, American consumers spend an unholy sum of money this time of year on gifts for loved ones and “I deserve this” presents for themselves. Vacations and cool travel experiences, expensive dinners out with the family, new cars, new big screen TVs… heck, throw in that super modern, mostly automated, you barely have to carry the load of laundry downstairs washer/dryer combo.

As a country, the US spends trillions of dollars every year between the start of November and December 31. That’s trillions, with a “t.” It’s big business, with a capital “B.”

man holding a credit card and typing on laptopA good portion of those funds get spent online. During the 2018 holiday season, for example, Americans were estimated to have spent nearly $120 billion (it’s with a “b” this time) on the web.

A solid online advertising plan is a must if you hope to tap into all of that consumer holiday spending. If you’re a small or moderate-size retail business, however, you might feel a little intimidated or even drowned out by all the noise that traditionally comes from the heavy hitters – your Amazons, Walmarts, Best Buys, Macy’s’ and the like.

But there’s no need to get discouraged. With the internet being the great equalizer, the right paid search strategy can yield huge returns and pay off big.

“What might that right strategy be?”, you might ask. To find out, we sat down with our Digital Advertising Team. The following insights from Beacon’s paid search experts are some of the most essential parts of a winning holiday season advertising strategy.

Insight 1: Be prepared to spend more when the holiday season rolls around 

dollar bills

Like that old adage goes: “You have to spend money to make money.” That couldn’t be more true when the trees start shedding their leaf coats and the shopping season approaches.

In the paid search world, this is the time of year when ad spends get an extra boost. There are two related reasons for this.

One, it’s the start of a feeding frenzy, and everyone is getting in on the action. That increase in competition means that you’ve got to allocate more funds just to attain the same results from earlier in the year. And, if you hope to beat out your top competitors, you’ll probably need to beat their spend budget. Everybody is spending more, and you’ve got to keep up.

Secondly, that increase in competition also drives up the cost of the keywords you’re bidding on. Depending on how many competitors are bidding on it, a term that cost you $1 yesterday can quickly double, or even triple, tomorrow.

“For many advertisers, holiday sales and Q4 earnings make up a significant amount of their annual revenue,” says Jordan Burleson, Chief Strategist for Digital Marketing at Beacon. “Online search traffic will spike in the months of November and December. And therefore, your average cost-per-click will increase 20% to 50%, resulting in less traffic for the same cost.”

Don’t be shocked or upset when this happens. In fact, building this expected increase into your allocated advertising budget in advance can help you stay both sane and competitive.

Speaking of planning…

Insight 2: Have your advertising plan ready well before Black Friday rolls around

woman holding up shopping bagsA lot of transactions happen on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. But, there’s a healthy number of people who prefer to get their shopping done early. In fact, as many as 39% of all holiday purchases take place before the Thanksgiving holiday. That means, you’ve got to be ready to roll with your paid ads… like, now.

On the other hand, you also don’t want to blow through your budget too early and miss a rush on your products or services later in the season. Are there mid-December sales that you’re planning to run? After Christmas promotions? New Year’s specials?

You may want to reserve some of your budget to target potential customers for those sales events. To maximize these opportunities, it’s also important to be intimately familiar with your business and industry seasonal cycle.

Having a good plan based on known customer trends is key to holiday season success.

Insight 3: Make use of negative terms 

Ok, so far, we have “spend more money” and “make a plan.” Good advice, but not the type to satisfy the cost-conscious crowd, right?

Well, don’t worry, we haven’t forgotten about you. After all, successful businesses know how to spend wisely.

One way to optimize your ad dollars is by ensuring that they’re not spent on bad or non-strategic keywords. Savvy PPC marketers create a black list of negative keywords which prevents automated platforms from displaying your ads for searches that include those terms.

“Negative keywords are essential for any good PPC campaign,” says Olivia Earley, one of Beacon’s Paid Search Specialists. “Acting as a barrier for unwanted search terms, negative keywords protect your account from unwanted key phrases, saving you money while increasing conversions and click-through rates.”

Insight 4: Use all available space on the playing field

An online ad is pretty simple, right? It appears at the top of a search engine results page (SERP) and displays a short description of a product, event, sale or promotion.

Well, as with everything related to the digital world, paid ads have continually evolved to deliver more nuanced, targeted and specific information. On top of the space for the typical advertising copy, online ads now feature ad extensions. Extensions are extra opportunities to deliver specific types of content.

“Paid ads have expanded to feature a lot more useful information for potential customers,” reports Beacon paid search analyst Zach Wellman. “Ad extensions allow you to deliver actionable content that empowers consumers to more easily reach the content they intend to find.”

Extensions can be links to specific pages on your website (sitelinks), a phone number that can be automatically dialed from your mobile device, your average product/seller rating, the physical address of your store, even pictures of your products.

In fact, image-based product listing ads (or, shopping ads) are the newest paid search fad. In a product listing ad, the main feature of the ad are photos of your products rather than marketing copy.

Extensions and product listing ads also have the advantage of occupying more space in SERPs than the typical online ad. And, the more space you take up, the less you leave for your competitors.

Which brings us to our last point…

100 m race trackInsight 5: It’s all about the competition

If you hope to beat your digital competitors, there are two things you absolutely have to do: 1) know how they’re selling, and 2) sell where they’re selling.

That means that you should keep an eye on the ads that your top competitors run. Tracking your competitors’ ads gives you a good idea of what keywords they’re targeting. It also allows you to match or improve upon the offers your potential customers see and increases your odds of earning their clicks.

Another thing you should do is bid on your competitors’ branded keywords (their names).

“Bidding on competitors is essential to making sure you are staying relevant to your potential leads,” says PPC specialist Sammy Kleege. “Not only do they get a comparison in products, you get to stay on top of what your competitors are doing that you may not be.”

Advertising in your competitor’s wheelhouse may seem like an aggressive tactic. And, in some ways it is. But, it’s also how savvy marketers get a leg up. Besides, if your competitors are worthy opponents, they’re probably doing the same to you.

Beacon Knows PPC

Want a more sophisticated approach to your paid search efforts? Beacon is here to help. Give us a call, we’re eager to talk to you about your business.

22 10, 2019

Trick or Treat: A Spooktacular Guide to Good Content

By | 2019-10-24T09:27:30+00:00 October 22nd, 2019|Categories: Digital Marketing, Ecommerce, SEO|Tags: , , |

There is so much marketing information out there these days. Blogs, websites, articles, white papers, podcasts, videos… many of them developed and deployed to convince you to part with your hard-earned money on just the right products.

Indeed, content marketing is all the rage. But not all content is created equal. In fact, there is a lot of bad content out there. So, what makes for great content?

There’s no single, easy answer. And the replies you’ll receive are likely to differ, sometimes wildly, depending on whom you may ask. But, the question becomes less abstract and more actionable when we narrow down the scope of the query: how do you go about creating great content for the web?

At the core, all great web content accomplishes one thing – informs, or educates, the reader via relevant, useful and organized information. For us marketers, however, content also has to drive action – be it a sign-up for a newsletter, a download of a white paper or (most preferred) a purchase of a product or service.

So, let’s discuss how best to create content with good-to-great potential for conversion. With candy on our minds and Halloween just around the corner, we’ll use the holiday as a surprisingly good metaphorical vehicle to parse the subject.

Shop for the Right Candy

Starting on a new piece of content can seem daunting at first. Trust us, no one enjoys a blank screen staring them in the face. It can be as scary as a haunted house.

What’s even scarier is wasting time writing content that no one will bother to read. So, before you start putting words on a page, you should know a bit about who you are writing for and why.

Know Your Audience(s)

Question: when your trick-or-treat guests ring your doorbell, do you think they’d be satisfied if you offered them an apple?

Unlikely, at best, right? The kids put effort into their costumes, they’re out there hustling from house to house… They’re definitely not doing it for fruit. They want the CANDY!

Same with your primary audience. They’ve come online with a purpose. Typed a query into a search engine for a reason. Clicked on your link with expectation. If you serve them an apple, it’s a safe bet that that’s the last you’ll see of them.

Ok, let’s take it one step further. Kids don’t go to strangers’ homes by themselves. They’re usually accompanied by their parents. And parents have a whole different set of needs.

If you’re a nice, thoughtful host, you’ll consider the needs of your secondary audience. Maybe a warm beverage or a non-candy snack will help them endure the chilly, late-October evening.

People recognize when you go the extra mile, or do something special. And that helps to establish trust, a necessary starting point for any budding relationship.

Be Prepared to Answer Their Most Pertinent Questions

The obvious question your Halloween guests have is, of course: “trick or treat?”. Translated into vernacular it means: “do you have candy for me?”. (For the spoiled audiences, it might be “do you have good candy for me?”.)

It’s not hard to anticipate this question on October 31. But, not all circumstances and audience are that easy.

When producing high quality content, it’s necessary to put yourself into the shoes of your audience and ask yourself what is it that they are looking to find out. The more you’re able to visualize yourself as part of the audience, the better you’ll be able to anticipate their needs.

Do Your Research

Just because you know the questions, doesn’t mean you know the answers.

Before you start writing, be sure you have the right information to present to your audience. This may involve online research, consulting with a co-worker who possesses specialized knowledge in the right subject area or even an interview with a subject matter expert outside of your organization.

You definitely don’t want to take your eye off the ball here… again, keep the fruit out of the candy bowl.

Dress Up

So, you know there are going to be kids out in the neighborhood, hungry for candy. And you know they’ll be accompanied by supervising adults. But, can you be sure that they’re not just going to stroll right past your house? 

If there are no lights on and it doesn’t look like anyone’s home, your doorbell may never get rung. And if your house looks too creepy (in a non-Halloween way), the parents may actively want to skip it. You’ve got to do something to entice the trick-or-treaters to make it down your long driveway and to your door.

That means, you’ve got to make your home appear welcoming by putting up some house decorations – the more extravagant, the better. Preferably, something that points the way to the candy bowl by your door. And, if you want to make the experience even more memorable for your guests, you should wear a creative costume that leaves an impression.

How can you dress up your content to be presented at it’s most appealing?

Keeping your paragraphs short for easy readability is a good start. Adding captivating images or videos can also help your readers engage with your page. Providing internal links and easy to see call-to-action buttons are great ways to point your audience to additional relevant content and highlight the final action they’ll need to take.

Give Out the Good Candy So They Come Back Next Year

Ok, you’ve got them at your door and perusing your candy offering. This is the moment of truth. You want the kids to take the candy, the adults to appreciate the warm beverage, and both groups to have a fun experience that stands out to them.

You’re serving candy and not fruit, your house is lit up and decked out with witches on brooms, you’re wearing your finest Halloween attire… you’re sure to get record visitors, right?

Not so fast. You can do everything right up to this point and still not meet your goals if your offering is not up to the standards or expectations of your guests.

Just because it’s candy, doesn’t mean it’s the right candy, or good candy. If the candy looks old, or has a torn wrapper, you might just lose your credibility on the spot – despite all the hard work you’ve put in.

Same with content. The presentation has to be as good as everything else.

That means writing a great headline, structuring your content clearly with proper usage of headings (H2s, H3s, H4s, etc), keeping an active voice and maintaining a reasonable word count. More importantly, your content has to stay on topic, do a great job educating on the most pertinent subjects and fulfill your users’ intent.

Your readers should reach the end of the page with a clear idea of what they’ve just read and an understanding of what they should do next. If you can do all that, you might just gain the trust of your readers and improve your chances of creating a repeat customer.

Beacon Knows Great Content

Is your site content in the best shape it could be? Not sure? One way to find out is with a complimentary content audit. Request one today from Beacon’s content strategy experts.

19 07, 2018

GDPR: What Is It? Does It Apply To Me? And So What?

By | 2019-05-06T11:06:03+00:00 July 19th, 2018|Categories: Beacon News, Ecommerce, Google Analytics|Tags: , , , |

If you work in digital marketing, you probably couldn’t help but notice the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) mania sweeping the internet earlier this year. Indeed, before the new regulations became enforceable in May 2018, there was breathless anticipation and countless “What You Need To Know” blog posts promising the low-down on all the important compliance implications.

Any new regulation is bound to create a few headaches as affected parties figure out the new landscape and work out the kinks. But, a law as sweeping as GDPR promised to be — impacting the very foundation of how e-commerce works — has the potential to thoroughly disrupt the status quo, and everyone’s comfort level along with it.

So, has our digital existence been turned upside down since May? Are we really living in a whole new internet reality?

Here, at Beacon, we were very much interested in the potential of GDPR to impact our ability to collect and analyze consumer data via Google Analytics (our preferred data aggregation platform). So, after a couple of months under the new regulations, as the dust has begun to settle, we decided to take a look around at the brave, new, GDPR-compliant world and see what’s what.

What Is GDPR?

Let’s start by defining what GDPR does. According to the European Commission website, the body that created the legislation, GDPR governs:

“the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data.”

In simple terms, the new rules aim to protect the personal data of all European Union citizens by explicitly granting them greater control over how their personal digital data is used and stored by others. GDPR applies to any company, person or entity that has the potential to gain access to personal data of EU citizens for non-personal use.

Yeah, But Does GDPR Apply to My Organization?

Because there are no national borders on the internet, EU residents (and everyone else) can easily access websites hosted in other countries. As such, the practical implication of GDPR is that it applies globally, no matter where your company or organization is legally headquartered.

If your website can be accessed by someone in the European Union — and if it’s up and running, it absolutely can be — then you should be paying attention. So, if you haven’t already, make sure your organization undertakes a review of how your site’s visitor data is collected, compiled and stored in Google Analytics (or, whichever platform you use).

What Does GDPR Impact?

There are three major areas of emphasis with GDPR: data collection management, data protection and visibility, and restrictions on data use.

The new regulations affecting data collection management require companies to get consent from consumers before collecting and storing their personal data. This means that when you visit your favorite online store, the retailer will have to ask you for explicit permission to track your shopping session and see what jeans you’re interested in buying. More than that, consumers have the choice to opt out or limit how their online behavior is tracked.

If you grant permission to track your shopping experience, or choose to share any other personal information — like your address and contact information when you sign up for a store rewards program, for example — the retailer has the responsibility of protecting that collected information from falling into the wrong hands. Not only that, because EU consumers have the right to request that their data be deleted, businesses have to know exactly where they store your personally identifiable consumer data in order to comply with any consumer requests.

In addition to requests to delete their data, under GDPR, consumers are enabled to exercise more granular control over what data is collected and how it is used. Consumers are empowered to rescind their data collection permission at any time they want. They can also request that your company turn over their data to a third-party or another retailer.

All of this means that, going forward, companies doing business online should have a sophisticated, flexible and responsive system of collecting and managing consumers’ personal data.

What Should I Be Doing?

To understand exactly what your company should be doing to accommodate these new consumer-centered protections, speak with your legal team. Your attorneys should be able to provide guidance tailored to your industry and circumstances.

If that entails a re-imagining of your data collection and management processes on your website, or through Google Analytics, give Beacon a call. We’ll be glad to walk you through the platform and recommend a course of action. Give our experts a shout at 866.964.5590.

12 08, 2016

eCommerce Analysis: Using Google Analytics to Identify Your Whales and Minnows

By | 2016-11-22T17:47:23+00:00 August 12th, 2016|Categories: Ecommerce, Google Analytics|Tags: , , |

If you manage an eCommerce site, you probably spend a lot of time in Google Analytics. There’s a ton of great metrics and reports to check out, like mutli-channel attribution, average order values by channel, eComm conversion rates, and so on. You’ve probably even segmented data by demographic, device type, or geography. All of this is great, high-five yourself if you’re doing these things because you’re probably a few steps ahead of your competition. But have you ever segmented by transaction dollar amount? I’m about to enlighten you on a couple advanced segments to help you identify your whales (biggest customers), your minnows (smallest customers), and how to get more whales and less minnows.

OK, got your coffee? Let’s go!

First thing we’re going to do is figure out your top 10% and bottom 10% transaction thresholds.

Go to Conversions > Ecommerce > Sales Performance. Expand your list to show all available transactions, then export to XLSX.

transaction report

The next step is to identify the thresholds for your top 10% of transactions. Open up the XLSX file, put filters in your headings, and remove the last row of data where your totals show (keeping it in skews your sorting).

Sort the revenue column from largest to smallest, then apply some conditional formatting, as seen in the screenshot below. Repeat this step with the bottom 10%.

*Side note: If you’re not familiar with this feature in Excel, I highly recommend becoming a conditional-formatting-ninja, it will shave tons of time off of your analysis.

top 10

Once you’ve got both conditional formats applied, simply look at the lowest dollar amount in your upper 10% grouping, and the highest dollar amount in your lower 10% grouping. These are your thresholds. In my case, using the Google Merch Store test account, I’ve identified $259.50 as the upper threshold, and $13.59 as the lower threshold.

Now the good stuff begins.

Head back into your Google Analytics account and create a new advanced segment. We’re looking for users who have a per-user revenue of $259.50 or greater, so we create the segment as shown below:

advanced segment

Now that you’ve got a segment created, apply it, and you’re free to check out other reports to analyze where these users come from, how the interact with the site, and figure out what you can do to acquire more people that would fall into this segment.

A few good starting points for conducting this analysis are:

  • The Source/Medium report in Acquisition – Perfect for learning how your whales found you
  • The Mobile Overview report in Audience – This is great for device type analysis. i.e. are your whales coming through mobile or desktop? Assumptions can be dangerous, so it’s always a good idea to investigate
  • The Landing Page report in Behavior – Surely, you’ve got some pages on your site that are more likely to drive purchase, but which ones are the best?

Of course there are plenty of other reports you can gain insights from, this list is only intended to kick start your analysis engine.

Once you’ve conducted your whales analysis, circle back and repeat the process for minnows. The idea is the same, but this time around you’re trying to identify ways to attract fewer minnows. So check out the same reports in Google Analytics and identify channels that drive small transactions, landing pages the don’t perform as well, et al.

If you do this on a regular basis and make adjustments to your marketing efforts accordingly, you’ll start to see your thresholds shifting upwards, as well as increases in your average order value.

17 04, 2013

Display different product prices in AspDotNetStorefront

By | 2016-11-23T10:31:15+00:00 April 17th, 2013|Categories: Ecommerce|Tags: , , , , |

Recently one of our AspDotNetStorefront clients asked me to come up with a way to modify the display of his products that vary by price.  One of the things I really like about AspDotNetStorefront is that there are often “hidden gems” or functionality that you might not use one day, but come up with a way to incorporate it later.  For this client, I recommended that he investigate either the product attribute features of a simple product or set up the products with separate variants.

Attribute Option

This is the easiest product setup and, in general, requires the least XML package modification/development, but may not be the ideal user experience, depending upon the type of product being sold.

  1. Log into ASPDNSF Admin and search for the product to modify
  2. Click on the product and then on the Main tab
    • Change “Color Option Prompt” to the appropriate label to indicate why this product has multiple prices (for example “Product Options”).
    • Change the XML package to product.simpleproduct.xml.config
    • Hit the “Update” button.
  3. Go to the Product Variant link, click on the default product variant displayed and then click on the Attributes tab
  4. Enter text like this in “Colors” field– “Product Option 1[-100.00],Product Option 2[-50.00],Product Option 3”.  In this example, product option 1 will be $100 cheaper and Product Option 2 will be $50 cheaper than product option 3.  Add as many product types and prices as needed; separate all product options by commas.
  5. Hit “Update”  and then view the product on the live site.  Selecting “Product Option 1” from the drop down should  discount the item by $100 when added to the cart
  6. See http://manual.aspdotnetstorefront.com/p-967-varying-price-by-sizecolor.aspx for more info on this setup

Variant Option

Depending on the type of product, I think this is the best looking option for the customer, but sometimes requires modification of the XML package by a developer to display correctly.

  1. Log into ASPDNSF Admin and search for the product to modify
  2. On the Main tab
    • Change the XML package to product.variantsindropdown.xml.config
    • Save the product with the “Update” button
  3. Go to the Product Variant link and clone the default/existing variant using the “Clone” link.  Create as many clones as there will be product options for this product.
  4. Click on the first variant in the list.
  5. Change the variant name to “Product Option 1” (or other applicable label) and change the price field to the correct price for this product option and then save the variant.
  6. Click on each subsequent variant in the list and change the variant product name and price for that product option.
  7. Save the product and then view the product on the live site.  Each product variant will appear as a separate choice in the drop down box along with the applicable price for that product variant.

I hope that you find this information helpful!

13 02, 2012

Super quick Aspdotnetstorefront site setup

By | 2016-11-22T10:56:27+00:00 February 13th, 2012|Categories: Ecommerce|Tags: , |

There are literally thousands of settings that you can configure for a new AspDotNetStorefront site, but here is a set of instructions that we use to quickly set up a very basic non-eCommerce (catalog only) site in Version 8 of AspDotNetStorefront:

  1. Follow manual instructions to do a base install: Installation Guide
  2. Skin/Template set-up
    • Review the available default skins or purchase a skin template
    • Navigate to the docs/skins folder of your new AspDotNetStorefront site and rename the  Skin_1 folder to Skin_old
    • Copy the new skin to docs/skins and rename “Skin_1”
    • Resize the company logo to the height of the logo.jpg file included in the skins/skin_1/images/ and save as logo.jpg in this folder (if not a jpg file, see #3 below)
  3. Template.ascx Set-up– Open /docs/skins/skin_1/template.ascx in an HTML editor and make the following updates to the HTML code.
    • If the company logo is not a jpg file (png, for example), change logo.jpg in template file to correct logo name
    • Remove shopping cart and wishlist links from utility nav in template.ascx
    • Remove all links and content from top and bottom nav that do not apply
    • Update copyright line/year in footer
    • Remove departments/sections from left nav (if not in use on site)
  4. Style.css Set-up— Update colors and styles in docs/skins/Skin_1/styles.css as needed to match corporate colors
  5. Admin Set-up
    • Log into Admin with default id/password and create super users under Customers/Add New Customer and then Customers/View-Edit Customers/Super User button.  Notify new admins of id/password/Admin URL.  Log in with one of the new super-user accounts and delete default admin user. 
    • Update store details under Configuration/Site Configuration Wizard including Store Name, Store email address, etc.
    • Go to Configuration/Email and set email server information
    • Appconfig updates– Make the following updates in Configuration/Advanced/Appconfig Parameters
      • Search for “meta” in the Appconfigs section and complete all relevant fields with search engine data/keywords
      • Remove buy and wish list buttons by setting ShowBuyButtons and ShowWishButtons to “false”
      • Remove items from site map that should not be displayed by searching appconfigs for “sitemap.” and setting areas that should not be in site map to “false”
    • Hit reset cache to force updates to appear on public site
  6. Topics— Update the following under Content, Manage Topics in the Admin area
    1. Add content to all topic pages that are relevant to this company (about, service, security, hometopintro, etc.)
    2. Hyperlink any new topic pages to Help & Info box so they show in the left navigation
    3. Review each existing topic page and do the following:
      • Remove topics that will definitely not be used using “Delete Topic” button
      • Set topics that should not show in sitemap to “no” with “Publish in Site Map” field
      • Update text on all topics that start with “Empty” and “Productnotfound” topic
      • Update hometopintro with homepage content
      • Update pagenotfound text
  7. Products/Categories– Add Categories and Products using either a product import (our preference) or manually in Admin
  8. Complete “Go Live” checklist
  9. Carefully review and test the site, make revisions as needed
  10. LAUNCH THE SITE!
7 02, 2011

Notes from the field.

By | 2016-11-23T09:57:13+00:00 February 7th, 2011|Categories: Ecommerce|Tags: , , , , |

I attended a Webinar hosted by Vortx recently and had a chance to learn a few things that can affect conversions of shoppers.

1. 75% of shoppers use the search box to find products. They pointed out that the top 10 e-tailers all have the same style search box: a long narrow search box prominently displayed in the header.

2. You have 7 seconds to impact a shopper with the product detail, after that they will typically go to another product.

3. There are 3 main pieces of information shopper want to see quickly:

  • Product Image
  • Product Description
  • Pricing/ Add to Cart

These items need to be clearly defined and prominent. Add to Cart button should be above the fold and use a color scheme to draw the eye to it.

4. The use of tabs is fading, major e-tailers are no longer using them to convey information.