Keana Lynch

About Keana Lynch

Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.

Love Quiz: Fall In Love with Your Website Again

You have genuine feelings for your website, but you’re not entirely sure you’d call it love. Or, maybe your digital relationship has been less than fulfilling and you’re starting to wonder… is this a relationship worth saving?

Take this quiz to find out if it’s time to get more serious about a website redesign.

Question #1: How do you feel about your website’s friends?

If you’ve been “dating” your website for a long time, you’ve more than likely met the friends. If not, it’s time you do. Meet Google Analytics and Google Site Search. Believe it or not, they’re your best friends, too. Get to know them well as they can be the key to opening your significant other’s digital heart.

The “E” Word

That’s right. Engagement. Google Analytics can provide insights into the type of content that drives visitors and captivates users. Find out which pages are under-performing and adjust your new content strategy accordingly.

More importantly, ask yourself which pages are performing best. Exploit these subject areas in your new, updated content strategy. Some topics may need to be called out more. Knowing your website’s likes and dislikes can only make for a more healthy relationship.

Google Site Search

Google Site Search can tell you what users are searching for when they first meet your website. Are users satisfied with what they find? The results may be surprising. You may find new areas of opportunity that you’d never thought of. Are they searching for a product or online course that you don’t yet offer? Maybe it’s time to expand your catalog.

Get Your Friends’ Input, too.

A focus group is an ideal way to find out what your users need and want from this relationship. Identify your audience correctly and your focus group will be effective.

For example, in the case of a college or university, your focus group may be made up of a combination of students, prospective students and alumni. Keep the size at a manageable number (about 10-15). With the right moderator, you’ll find out what you need to know about your user’s habits and objectives so that you can design optimally for a more fulfilling relationship next go-round.

Question #2: Is your online presence responsive to your needs?

Responsive is the key word here. 86% of those between the ages of 18 and 29 have a smart phone. If this is your audience (that’s you, Higher Ed), this one’s a no-brainer. By contrast, 87% of those living in households making in excess of $75,000 a year have a smart phone (that’s your audience, online retailers). If your current website isn’t responsive, this is step one to a more healthy relationship.

Beauty is More Than Skin Deep (although that counts, too)

Often, websites fall behind as organizational branding requirements evolve. This is a chance to update a color theme, new logo, etc. And while looks are important, inner beauty is even more so. Make sure the voice of your website is consistent with your other collateral.

Incorporate images and video where appropriate. In short, it’s a great time to make sure that you and your website are speaking the same language – the language of (digital) love.

Question #3: Does your website’s content still give you butterflies?

We’ve all seen the data on declining attention spans. That’s very likely true for your audience, too. Creating a logical navigation and page structure ensures that your site is easily scanned – an essential element to today’s website design.

Start with an overview and make sure you’ve written relevant headings and used SEO friendly tags accordingly (H2s, H3s. etc.). Use bulleted or numbered lists where appropriate. Link to other relevant internal pages and make sure that link text is meaningful.

Breaking up (blocks of text) is hard to do. Not really. Nevertheless, it always seems to be overlooked. This one’s an easy fix. Don’t forget it.

Call Me

If you’re looking for a new website, that is. We at Beacon don’t claim to be “doctors of love” but we’ve been helping guide clients through their digital relationships for almost 20 years. Feel free to contact me with questions or call one of our team members at 1.855.467.5447.

 

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-10-17T08:01:53+00:00 October 18th, 2017|Web Development|0 Comments

Creating a Focus Group for Your Higher Ed Redesign – Part 2

Below is part two of “How to Create an Effective Focus Group for Your Higher Ed Redesign”. To read part one, visit here.

How to Choose a Focus Group Moderator

A moderator is much more than a note taker. You’ll need one of those, too. However, your moderator will be responsible for eliciting the most from your focus group. The moderator has a profound effect on the success (or failure) of your focus group as they are expected to set a relaxed tone, keep the discussion focused, observe body language and other cues, and create an environment that elicits the most valuable input from your participants.

Moderators must be good listeners. They must be able to manage a group dynamic and facilitate the kind of environment that makes participants want to share. Moderators have different styles. However, a good moderator will adapt to the personality of the focus group. For example, a moderator may joke with student participants while taking a more serious tact with faculty or administrators.

An experienced moderator will effectively manage the group and keep everyone focused. A good listener can ask the right follow up questions and get your participants to share things they might not otherwise.

Analyzing the Results

Before any analysis begins, take a few moments immediately after the focus group leaves to recall the day’s events and fill in any gaps that may exist in your notes. If you’ve taped the session, transcribe it immediately and note any observations regarding body language or behavioral anomalies within the context of the conversation.

After you’ve got each answer grouped with the question it addresses, take a look at your data and ask yourself the following:

  • For each question, are there any responses that stand out?
  • Does the data answer your research objectives?
  • Are there any recurring themes?
  • Are these themes unexpected?
  • What insights have been gained?

Writing a Focus Group Report

A report on your findings should begin with a summary of your objectives. What specifically did you hope to learn from the focus group?

Be sure to include your methodology. How many different focus groups were there, how large were these groups and what questions did the moderator ask the focus group in the search for answers?

What stood out from the answers provided by the focus groups? Provide a bulleted list of key takeaways that can be scanned at a glance. These will serve as talking points when stakeholders gather to discuss redesign priorities and strategy.

Summarize Your Findings and Make Recommendations

Highlight repetitive themes, particularly if they directly address previously stated concerns and objectives. What do these findings mean for the proposed redesign? Based on your redesign objectives and focus group feedback, make recommendations to the stakeholders involved.

As one of the nation’s premier website builders for Higher Ed., Beacon has been providing colleges and universities with redesign consultation and services for almost 20 years. We invite questions or comments regarding your redesign goals. Feel free to contact me or call one of our team members at 1.855.467.5447.

This concludes part two of two. Read part one of “Creating a Focus Group for your Higher Ed Redesign” here.

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-10-11T07:45:01+00:00 October 4th, 2017|Higher Education|Comments Off on Creating a Focus Group for Your Higher Ed Redesign – Part 2

Creating a Focus Group for Your Higher Ed Redesign – Pt1

(This is part one of a two part article)

At the time it was created, your website may have met every online objective defined by university administrators. However, things change with time. Shifting technologies, user habits and objectives change the ways in which we appeal to our target audience. A website redesign is needed every now and then. With so many audiences to address including students, prospective students, alumni, and more, this can seem a daunting task. What works well with your existing design? What needs to be changed? You may have your own ideas however, you can’t know what every user may be thinking.

Assembling a Focus Group

There are numerous ways to collect user data to assist you in your redesign. You can send a user survey or questionnaire, for example. While this method can provide some useful information, your feedback is one dimensional as there is no way to ask for explanation. Additionally, one cannot read the subject’s body language or witness the group dynamic. There is no opportunity for give and take.

I strongly suggest conducting focus groups in person, if possible. In person groups allow for follow up questions and clarification. One can more easily identify agreement across the group, provoke thought and prompt participants to offer suggestions.

Identify Your Primary Audience

Before you go any further, it is imperative that you identify your target audience(s). There may be many different potential user groups you’d like to address with your redesign. However, when you try to please everyone, you often please no one. So identify the 3 or 4 major players. This ensures that your website will have the required focus to be effective. It also works to keep your focus group at a manageable number.

How big should your focus group be?

I’ve found that the best way to facilitate the desired give and take is to keep the size of each group at around 10-15 individuals. Once you get beyond 15, it’s a case of diminishing returns. It becomes difficult for a moderator to steer the conversation and ask follow up questions if there are too many voices in the room.

Inviting Focus Group Participants

Be aware of the fact that each of your focus groups behave differently. That’s why they’re here. This extends to their willingness to participate. Extend invitations to more students than any other group. Their participation levels tend to be lower than others so provide an incentive to attend. For students, free food often does the trick.

How to Develop Questions for a Focus Group

While there are a certain number of questions you absolutely need the answer to, allow for ample time to address questions that your focus group participants have. These can be as illuminating as any questions you may have. Plan on 10 or fewer questions per 60 minute session. Answers to these will very likely lead to new questions you may have not anticipated. While the questions will differ for each of your four focus groups, there are some basic guidelines designed to facilitate meaningful responses and avoid “yes” and “no” answers.

Remember to:

  • Arrange your questions in a logical order.
  • Start with higher level questions and get more granular as you go.
  • Ask open ended questions. These include questions that address design, content and intended usage and require more than a “yes” or “no” answer.
  • Encourage questions by participants.

This concludes part one of a two part article entitled “Creating a Focus Group for your Higher Ed Redesign”. As one of the nation’s premier website builders for Higher Ed, Beacon has been providing colleges and universities with redesign consultation and services for almost 20 years. We invite questions or comments regarding your redesign goals. Feel free to contact me or call one of our team members at 1.855.467.5447.

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-09-21T12:51:06+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Higher Education|Comments Off on Creating a Focus Group for Your Higher Ed Redesign – Pt1

Top 5 Accessibility Items to Review in a Website Redesign

Accessibility is a hot topic and an expansive one, too. I’ve been preparing for some upcoming speaking engagements with accessibility being the main focus. The first of these engagements is the eduWeb Digital Summit on August 6-10. This seems like a good time to share some thoughts regarding accessibility, WCAG guidelines and 508 compliance.

Additionally, I’d like to leave you with a list of 5 important accessibility items to review while in the midst of your next site redesign.

Accessibility Overview

Often, when administrators or oversight committees are asked to consider website accessibility while planning their institution’s website redesign, they think only in terms of addressing under-served users such as the elderly or visually disabled. Accessibility doesn’t simply address the needs of the disabled user. Adaptations and modifications made to address under-served users have broader implication, frequently enhancing the experience for all users. Designers and developers understand this and design with the idea that what is good for one is most often to the benefit of all.

Accessibility almost always enhances a website’s usability.

For example, incorporating design for those with diminished motor skills is always a good idea. It will enable all users to view your website without having to use a mouse. By doing so, you’ve also made it easier for any user to navigate the site and spend some time there. User engagement improves and, if you’re operating an online storefront, sales go up as well.

It goes without saying that any and all websites should factor accessibility into their design. To that end, WCAG recommendations and 508 standards have been established as guidelines to ensure a positive user experience for all. These guidelines have peripheral benefits, as they often overlap with best practices for mobile design and SEO. Still, there are many, many sites that remain inaccessible to a large number of users even today.

5 Accessibility Items to Review

With this in mind, I’ve comprised an abbreviated list of important accessibility items to consider when redesigning one’s website. Bear in mind that while I’ve listed 5 important accessibility items, this list is hardly complete and is meant only to provide a high level overview of what’s involved. Consider:

  1. Clear and Logical Design – This includes clear and intuitive navigation, contrast between text and backgrounds, proper use of color and more.
  2. CMS that Supports Accessibility – You’ve already considered functional requirements. Not all content management systems meet WCAG accessibility requirements. Know this from the start.
  3. Content Structure – Use headings and lists so as to clearly organize information. Use clear title attributes and page titles. Consider skip navigation for users of screen readers.
  4. Keyboard Accessible Functionality – Users with motor skill deficiency depend on keyboard accessibility to navigate your site. Other users benefit from added efficiency thanks to keyboard accessibility guidelines.
  5. Accessible Forms – Using JavaScript in forms often means that they are not accessible by keyboard alone. Testing your forms for keyboard accessibility is an imperative.

Once the items listed above have been fully considered and incorporated into the new design, the all-important testing phase begins.

Testing for Accessibility

Accessibility and usability are undeniably congruous. The benefits extend beyond just the user experience and into SEO and mobile performance. So take the time to test and test again. It’s time well invested. Fortunately, the WC3 provides a list of recommended web accessibility evaluation tools.

A Few Final Words

I look forward to seeing many of you at the upcoming eduWeb conference in August. I’ll discuss the topic of accessibility in more detail at that time. In the meantime, please comment below. Share your thoughts and experiences. We’ll pick up where we left off at the conference. See you then.

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-07-17T07:14:26+00:00 June 30th, 2017|Higher Education, Web Development, Creative Design|Comments Off on Top 5 Accessibility Items to Review in a Website Redesign

Bacon Poll: What’s the Best Kind of Bacon?

With our new branding changes, we really want to get a feel for what our clients and partners think is the BEST kind of bacon out there? There are so many to choose from, but in the end, we had to narrow it down to just a few. Tell us your favorite by participating in our poll:

What’s the Best Bacon?

American Bacon
Canadian Bacon
Turkey Bacon
Tofu Bacon

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2016-10-31T10:39:37+00:00 April 1st, 2016|Web Development|Comments Off on Bacon Poll: What’s the Best Kind of Bacon?

Style Guides for Web Design and Development

style-guide

Developers, designers and web administrators are always looking for ways to improve how they manage the look, feel and complexity when building a web site. This can be difficult when we have multiple team members or new members involved in ongoing projects. So how can we help maintain global branding and development patterns for sites that all users can utilize? Style guides.

What is a style guide?

A style guide is a document of code standards that details the various elements and patterns of a site or application. It is a one-stop place to see all visual styles of the site such as headers, links, buttons, color pallets and any visual language that is used on the site.

2015-09-15_1518

Check out a few of the other style guides below published by some great brands.

Why should you use a style guide?

Style guides take extra time to develop up front but we have found that they have numerous beneficial factors for developing.

  • Faster build time for new sections and pages.
  • Design consistency is easier to maintain
  • Designers, developers and content owners have a one-stop guide to reference.
  • New team members joining the project can refer to the guide for the exact style use.
  • Keeps both code and design consistent throughout the site.
  • The guide allows us to standardize our code (CSS, JS, HTML), keeping it small and quick to load.

Steps to building a style guide?

Template

Start your guide with the sites foundations. These will include elements like color palette, fonts, headers, body text and grid layouts. These basic elements are the foundation global elements of your site that set the tone for your style guide.

Patterns

Next start adding in your site patterns. These would include buttons, logos, images, icon library, form styles, etc. Any element that belongs on your site should be included.

2015-09-15_1511_001

Documentation

Documentation is essential to make a style guide successful. Your documentation is the key to keeping a consistent style and development pattern throughout the site. Documentation can be done in the code itself with comments or using interactive modals or tool tips in the style guide.

Cascade Implementation

After completing the base code you can start integrating it into your CMS system. Not only can we use a style guide for visual and front end documentation but also for how the content functions within your CMS.

The following elements can be added to help guide developers in with the site setup:

  • Formats
  • Blocks
  • Template regions such as header, footer, navigation, widgets and dynamic feeds for news/events.
  • Build out full examples of your data definition regions. See example below of Cascade Server data definition containing all site content input areas.

2015-09-15_1526

Using the guide

So you have completed building your style guide. Now what? The first step is talking to your team about how to use the guide and what updates should continue to be made during projects to it. As new member join your team reference the guide as a way to introduce them to your site styles and code languages. Utilize the style guide when testing new code or modules on your site or just as a way to present new design elements to the team. The possibilities are endless.

Your style guide will never be complete and should continue to evolve as your site does.

References

 

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-06-16T12:24:15+00:00 September 17th, 2015|Cascade CMS|Comments Off on Style Guides for Web Design and Development

Progressive Enhancement

I had the privilege of attending “An Event Apart” in Austin, TX this week and feel like I have come home with an abundance of knowledge about leading practices in web development. This conference is an educational session for those passionate about standards-based web design and this year focused heavily on best practices for our multi-device world. Many developers are facing the challenges of 1000s of screen sizes and the multitude of ways people can now access the websites we create. With new devices coming out daily plus fascinating new ways to enhance sites visually and interactively, we sometimes forget that many people are still using older slower browser and devices. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be designing our sites without all the bells and whistles, but we cannot forgot about the other users. At the conference, one topic in general really helped explain how we create amazing sites without leaving anyone out. Progressive enhancement!

What is Progressive Enhancement?

“Progressive enhancement is a strategy for web design that emphasizes accessibility, semantic HTML markup, and external stylesheet and scripting technologies. Progressive enhancement uses web technologies in a layered fashion that allows everyone to access the basic content and functionality of a web page, using any browser or Internet connection, while also providing an enhanced version of the page to those with more advanced browser software or greater bandwidth.”

Basically, progressive enhancement allows everyone, no matter what their browser or internet connection may be, to access a web page and view the basic content and functionality. If you are running a more advanced browser or better bandwidth, you will get the enhanced version of the page.

Progressive Enhancement vs. Graceful Degradation

Both graceful degradation and progress enhancement focus on how a site works in all browsers and devices. The focus and how it affects the workflow is the key between these two methods.

graceful

For many years, web designers have been using the principle of graceful degradation to make sure users in older browsers can at least see the content on a site, even if it doesn’t look exactly like the design intended. It allows designers and developers to focus on building the website for the most advanced/capable browsers. Using this method leaves older browsers with poor, but passable experience.

progressive

Rather than focusing on browser technology and support, we can focus on the content and how the user will see this content no matter what they are on. The content of your site is the most important element, it’s what brings users to your site and should always be first priority.

So how does Progressive Enhancement work?

It’s best to think of progressive enhancement as different layers. We couldn’t build a home without a solid foundation, the same goes for our websites. Each layer builds on the previous to improve the interactivity on the website without losing a solid functional base.

Content first! Start with your content, marked up in rich, semantic HTML. Having well-thought-out HTML has the advantage of not needing presentation layers to make sense. This also means screen readers, search engine spiders and those on basic mobile browsers will be able to view your content without any distracting formatting issues.

Visual Enhancements (CSS) Once your base HTML and content is ready, you are ready for the visual enhancement layer, CSS.  The majority of desktop and mobile browsers support CSS, though not all support CSS3. The CSS should enhance the content and make the overall user experience better.

Interaction (JavaScript) The final layer of our web site is JavaScript and should be handled last. JavaScript can contribute so much to the usability and user experience of a website. It has revolutionized the way sites work and how we do things online. However, your website should always work without JS and there should be an HTML or server-side scripting alternative. While most web users have JS enabled, there are still some cases where JS is undesirable and not every mobile browser or screen reader has good support for it.

Once you understand progressive enhancement, the concept of it makes sense and is easy to do. We build for the very basic structure and then build out so that no matter what device or speed someone is viewing the site at, they will always be presented with what is important. The content!

 

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-08-11T16:23:44+00:00 October 4th, 2013|Web Development|2 Comments

Top Mobile Browsers

Within the mobile phone landscape, there are at least ten operating systems (OSs) and fifteen browsers that require consideration when testing. Web developers should concentrate their testing efforts on smartphones. All good mobile browsers run on one smartphone platform or another. To get stats of popular browsers in your country there’s only one source of mobile browser market share information: StatCounter.

Apple, Google, Samsung, and RIM default browsers are among the top browsers because they support touch events and are all based on the WebKit rendering engine. The next level of mobile browsers include Opera Mobile, Palm WebKit for webOS, and MicroB, the Gecko-based default browser for Nokia’s Maemo OS. These browsers do not support touch events, and zooming varies in each implementation. From a pure CSS and JavaScript point of view however, you’ll encounter few problems. Of the three, Opera Mobile is the most important, because it serves as a default browser for many Windows Mobile devices where the vendor decided IE wasn’t good enough. Currently, it’s an alternative for Nokia WebKit on Symbian, the largest mobile OS.

Below is a list of all the current mobile browsers, there special features, operating systems, and devices they can be found on. Some of the browsers do not come default on phones but are among the top browsers used today.

  • Opera Mobile
    • Key Features: Multiple tabs, Zoom-in
    • Operating System: Windows Mobile, Symbian
    • Devices pre-installed with Opera:
      • Nokia N90
      • Sony Ericsson P1
      • Sony Ericsson XPERIA X1
      • HTC Touch Viva
      • HTC Touch Diamond
      • HTC Touch Diamond2
      • HTC Touch Pro
      • HTC Touch Pro 2
      • HTC Touch HD
      • HTC HD2
      • Meizu M8
      • Creative Zii
      • Samsung i900 Omnia
      • Samsung i8000 Omnia II
      • Sendo X
      • Motorola ROKR E6
  • Opera Mini
    • Key Features: Compressed downloads for fast browsing, Zoom-in
    • Operating System: Java
    • Devices pre-installed with Opera Mini:
      • Motorola V980, E2, L7, i1
      • Nokia 2610,3120c, 2700 Classic, 2730 Classic, 3500c, 3600, 3600 slide, 3710 fold, 3720, 6085, 5130, 5230, 5500, 5310, 5610, 3110, 7373, 6131, 6233, 6600 slide, 5070, E65, N95, N71, N73, 5000, 3110c, 6288, 6103, 6080, 6303, 6300and 8800 Arte
      • Sony Ericsson K310i, K530i, K550, W200i, W760i, Z530i, Z550i, Z780i, W910i
      • Samsung X160, E570, E420, F480, X510, X650, E900, E250, U700, ZV60, D900i
      • LG K880, KU250, KE970, and KU311
      • SAGEM My411x and P9521
      • BenQ-Siemens EL71 and EF81
      • BenQ EZ1 fight
      • Orange Rio (ZTE-G X991)
  • Skyfire
    • Key Features: Display rich websites with Flash or widgets like YouTube, customizable zoom feature
    • Operating System: Android, iPhone, Symbian, Windows Mobile
    • Devices compatible with Skyfire:
      • Android 1.5, 1.6, 2.0, 2.1, 2.2
      • iOS 3.1.3, 4.0, 4.1
  • Safari
    • Key Features: Display rich websites like YouTube, zoom feature, excellent touch-based user interface
    • Safari accounted for 62.17 percent of mobile web browsing traffic in October 2011
    • Operating System: iPhone
    • Devices:
      • iPhone
      • iPod touch
      • iPad
  • Google Android
    • Key Features: Display rich websites, zoom feature, touch screen interface
    • Operating System: Google Android
    • Devices:
      • Android powered phones
  • Microsoft IE for Mobile
    • Key Features: Standard browser features
    • Operating System: Windows Mobile
    • Devices:
      • IE Mobile comes loaded by default with Windows Phone and Windows CE.
  • Firefox Mobile
    • Key Features: Mutiple tabs, Awesomebar, password manager, Add-on support, PC-syncing
    • Operating System: Nokia Maemo, Windows Mobile 6.0 (alpha)
    • Devices:
      • Android 2.1 and above devices with an ARMv7 CPU
  • Dolphin HD
    • Key Features: Gesture browsing, Webzine, tabbed browsing
    • Operating System:  Android, iOS
    • Devices:
      • Android
      • iPad
      • iPhone
  • Blackberry Browser
    • Key Features: Standard browser features
    • Operating System: BlackBerry OS
    • Devices:
      • Blackberry devices
  • S60 Web Browser
    • Key Features: Standard browser features
    • Operating System: S60
    • Devices:
      • S60
      • Symbian Mobile Phones
      • Nokia N8
      • Nokia E6
      • Nokia E7
      • Nokia C6-01
      • Nokia C7
      • Nokia X7
      • Nokia 603
      • Nokia 700
      • Nokia 701
Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2017-06-16T12:40:13+00:00 March 22nd, 2012|Web Development|Comments Off on Top Mobile Browsers

7 Factors to Consider When Redesigning Your Website

There are very few, if any, websites on the Internet that don’t undergo at least a minor facelift at some point in their lifecycle. If you own a business with a web presence, at some point, that site will need to be redesigned, whether it’s due to the changing nature of your business, or purely for aesthetic reasons.

Redesigning your company site can be a major undertaking, so we’ve put together a helpful list of things to keep in mind when considering a redesign.

1. Why Are You Redesigning?

This is perhaps the most deceptively complex, yet obvious question of all. Before undergoing any redesign, however, it’s important to understand what it is you wish to accomplish. Are you unhappy with the way your site functions? Do you simply want a better-looking site? Do you need to improve search engine rankings and sales conversions? Maybe the focus of your business has shifted and it’s time for new content.

These are all important factors to consider, so before you start, make a detailed list of what it is you wish to accomplish during the redesign. This will help guide you through the rest of the process and make sure you stay focused on the end goal.

2. What Type of Redesign Do You Need?

Now that you’ve decided exactly why you want to redesign your site, it’s time to decide just how far down the rabbit hole you need to go. Perhaps a small change in visuals and content is all that’s necessary. On the other hand, you may need to add new features or completely redo your underlying code base. Depending on your needs and budget, a large overhaul may be out of the question, or it may be the most cost-effective long-term solution, so take a moment to think about your needs going forward and work with your developer to strike a balance that best meets them.

3. What Does and Doesn’t Work Currently?

No matter how large or small the redesign, chances are there will be some elements of your existing site that work very well and some that don’t work at all. Now is the time to go through your site and identify these elements. Maybe your content is too verbose or your sales page isn’t very user-friendly. On the other hand, that photo gallery and the blog may be big-ticket items that do really well for your image and bring in lots of traffic. Some elements will need to remain (though possibly given a makeover), some will need to be cleaned up and some will have to go. Break your site down into its key components and then compare those with the goals you decided on in step one and the overall vision for your web site. If something doesn’t fit, it’s out.

4. How Is Your Site Being Used?

Along these same lines, don’t forget to take a look at how users are currently interacting with your site. This will help you identify great content and problem areas. Study your traffic statistics and site analytics for information on things such as entry and exit pages, sales conversions, and search engine keywords. This will help you to understand how visitors find your site and what they do once they get there. While you’re studying those statistics, also have a look at details like screen resolution and browser usage. This will help your developer determine what technical specifications your site should meet and whether a separate mobile version of your site is recommended, among other things.

5. Has Your Brand or Company Image Changed?

If you’ve undergone changes to your brand and company image, those changes need to be reflected in your site, even if the only updates are visual. Keep your logos updated and consider a color-overhaul if the corporate image or philosophy has shifted. Your website is often the first impression people get of your business, so it should grow and mature right along with the rest of your brand identity.

6. When and How Should You Launch Your Redesign?

When and how you launch your redesign can have a big impact on your traffic and in generating buzz about your new site and your product. Maybe you’re simply making improvements and want to slowly roll out changes over time and unannounced. This unobtrusive rollout won’t give you a lot of buzz, but it will still accomplish your goals of improving the site’s performance and the user’s experience. On the other hand, a big relaunch around the holidays or at the start of a big promotion, or when announcing a major change in the way your business operates can both draw traffic and generate more interest.

7. How Do I Make the Transition Smoother?

Most people are a little intimidated by change. If you have a site that gets a lot of repeat traffic, a sudden, drastic change in form and function can be a bit off-putting to some users. Further, you don’t want this drastic shift to damage search engine rankings and suddenly destroy any and all backlinks you may have gathered over the years.

Try and keep vital elements of your site similar to their existing counterparts, such as the main navigation and header. Usually, your redesign should strive to be an evolution of your existing site, not a dramatic replacement. If the change is dramatic, make sure it’s clear and give your users a blog post or news announcement discussing the changes.

Similarly, you want to make things easy for the search engine spiders, as well. Moved content should be redirected via 301 redirects, for instance, and error pages should be helpful and transmit the correct header information and meta data. For human visitors, make sure those error pages contain helpful information that is, where possible, relevant to the content the user was trying to access.

Source: Mashable.com

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2016-11-23T10:22:40+00:00 October 3rd, 2011|Web Development|Comments Off on 7 Factors to Consider When Redesigning Your Website

The Expressive Web (Beta)

The Expressive Web (Beta) was recently released by Adobe to showcase some of the newest and most expressive features that HTML5 and CSS3 can add to the web today. Personally I found this to be an amazing example of what’s in the future for web designers and developers.

The Expressive Web

The site highlights the following HTML5 and CSS3 features:

 

Each feature page contains:

  • A demo of the feature.
  • Data on browser support.
  • Links to examples in the wild that use the feature.
  • Links to more in-depth resources and tutorials.
  • Detection and fallback strategies for the feature.

 

To read the full article about the development and design of the site visit Adobe Introducing The Expressive Web

Keana Lynch
Keana Lynch is the Director of UX Design & Development at Beacon where she has provided leadership and consultation for over 35 Higher Education projects. She specializes in the analysis, design, and implementation of websites. Keana is very passionate about design and development strategies focused on user experience, accessibility, multi-device interactions, and technical best practices. Outside of work Keana enjoys spending time with her three dogs, hiking, kayaking and volunteering with local animal rescue groups.
By | 2016-11-04T08:52:46+00:00 August 31st, 2011|Web Development, Creative Design|Comments Off on The Expressive Web (Beta)
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